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Office of Neuroscience Research > Resources and Facilities > WUSTL Neuroscience Publications for the week

WUSTL Neuroscience Publications for the week

 

The publications below include authors at Washington University and were identified by Scopus search.  These are the most current publications.  For previous lists, visit the WUSTL Neuroscience publications archive.

December 4, 2017

1) 

Ziobrowski, H., Brewerton, T.D., Duncan, A.E.
Associations between ADHD and eating disorders in relation to comorbid psychiatric disorders in a nationally representative sample
(2018) Psychiatry Research, 260, pp. 53-59. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.026


a Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, United States
b Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States
c George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine whether previously observed associations of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with eating disorders (EDs) are at least partially attributable to other underlying psychopathology. Data came from 4719 participants aged 18–44 years in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication and the National Survey of American Life. DSM-IV diagnoses were assessed using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Multinomial logistic regression assessed associations between DSM-IV lifetime and past-12 month diagnoses of ADHD with EDs in unadjusted models and in models adjusted for demographic variables and other psychopathology. Lifetime ADHD was strongly and significantly associated with lifetime bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and any ED in unadjusted models, but not with anorexia nervosa or subthreshold BED. After adjusting for demographic variables and psychiatric comorbidities, all associations of lifetime ADHD with EDs were substantially attenuated, and only the association of ADHD with BN remained statistically significant. Similar results were found using past-12 month diagnoses. These results suggest that previously observed associations of ADHD with EDs might be due – at least in part – to additional psychiatric disorders that are often comorbid with both ADHD and EDs. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Author Keywords
Anorexia nervosa;  Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder;  Binge eating;  Bulimia nervosa;  Comorbidity


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

2) 

Yee, D.M., Braver, T.S.
Interactions of motivation and cognitive control
(2018) Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 19, pp. 83-90. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.11.009


Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in Saint Louis, United States


Abstract
There is general agreement that both motivation and cognitive control play critical roles in shaping goal-directed behavior, but only recently has scientific interest focused around the question of motivation–control interactions. Here we briefly survey this literature, organizing contemporary findings around three issues: (1) whether motivation preferentially impacts cognitive control processes, (2) the neural mechanisms that underlie motivation–cognition interactions, and (3) why motivation might be relevant for overcoming the costs of control. Dopamine (DA) is discussed as a key neuromodulator in these motivation–cognition interactions. We conclude by highlighting open issues, specifically Pavlovian versus instrumental control distinctions and effects of motivational valence and conflict, which could benefit from future research attention. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Document Type: Review
Source: Scopus

 

3) 

Ratajczyk, E., Ledzewicz, U., Leszczynski, M., Schattler, H.
Treatment of glioma with virotherapy and TNF-α inhibitors: Analysis as a dynamical system
(2018) Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems - Series B, 23 (1), pp. 425-441. 

DOI: 10.3934/dcdsb.2018029


a Institute of Mathematics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland
b Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, United States
c Dept. of Electrical and Systems Engr., Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Oncolytic viruses are genetically altered replication-competent viruses which upon death of a cancer cell produce many new viruses that then infect neighboring tumor cells. A mathematical model for virotherapy of glioma is analyzed as a dynamical system for the case of constant viral infusions and TNF-α inhibitors. Aside from a tumor free equilibrium point, the system also has positive equilibrium point solutions. We investigate the number of equilibrium point solutions depending on the burst number, i.e., depending on the number of new viruses that are released from a dead cancer cell and then infect neighboring tumor cells. After a transcritical bifurcation with a positive equilibrium point solution, the tumor free equilibrium point becomes asymptotically stable and if the average viral load in the system lies above a threshold value related to the transcritical bifurcation parameter, the tumor size shrinks to zero exponentially. Other bifurcation events such as saddle-node and Hopf bifurcations are explored numerically.


Author Keywords
Cancer treatment;  Glioma;  Optimal control;  Saddle-node and Hopf bifurcations;  Trans-critical


Document Type: Conference Paper
Source: Scopus

 

4) 

Van Buren, D.J., Wilfley, D.E., Marcus, M.D., Anderson, B., Abramson, N.W., Berkowitz, R., Ievers-Landis, C., Trief, P., Yasuda, P., Hirst, K.
Depressive symptoms and glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial
(2018) Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 135, pp. 85-87. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.11.008


a Washington University School of Medicine, United States
b University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, United States
c Baylor College of Medicine, United States
d Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, United States
e University of Pennsylvania, United States
f Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, United States
g SUNY Upstate Medical University, United States
h Children's Hospital Los Angeles, United States
i George Washington University Biostatistics Center, United States


Abstract
The relationship between depressive symptoms and glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes was assessed at baseline (n = 682), 6, and/or 24 months (n = 576). Neither baseline nor persistence of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with maintenance of glycemic control. Nevertheless, depressive symptoms were common, suggesting the importance of repeated screening. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Author Keywords
Adolescent;  Depressive symptoms;  Type 2 diabetes


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

5) 

Wan, L., Jin, H., Liu, X.-Y., Jeffry, J., Barry, D.M., Shen, K.-F., Peng, J.-H., Liu, X.-T., Jin, J.-H., Sun, Y., Kim, R., Meng, Q.-T., Mo, P., Yin, J., Tao, A., Bardoni, R., Chen, Z.-F.
Distinct roles of NMB and GRP in itch transmission
(2017) Scientific Reports, 7 (1), art. no. 15466, . 

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-15756-0


a Center for the Study of Itch, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Pain Medicine, State Key Clinical Specialty in Pain Medicine, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong, China
f Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong, China
g Department of Neurosurgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Medical University, Chongqing, China
h Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
i Department of Anesthesiology, First Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, Yunnan, China
j Department of Anesthesiology, Plastic Surgery Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical, Beijing, China
k Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
l Department of Anesthesiology, Renmin Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China
m Department of Anesthesiology, Southern Medical University, Foshan, Guangdong, China


Abstract
A key question in our understanding of itch coding mechanisms is whether itch is relayed by dedicated molecular and neuronal pathways. Previous studies suggested that gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is an itch-specific neurotransmitter. Neuromedin B (NMB) is a mammalian member of the bombesin family of peptides closely related to GRP, but its role in itch is unclear. Here, we show that itch deficits in mice lacking NMB or GRP are non-redundant and Nmb/Grp double KO (DKO) mice displayed additive deficits. Furthermore, both Nmb/Grp and Nmbr/Grpr DKO mice responded normally to a wide array of noxious stimuli. Ablation of NMBR neurons partially attenuated peripherally induced itch without compromising nociceptive processing. Importantly, electrophysiological studies suggested that GRPR neurons receive glutamatergic input from NMBR neurons. Thus, we propose that NMB and GRP may transmit discrete itch information and NMBR neurons are an integral part of neural circuits for itch in the spinal cord. © 2017 The Author(s).


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

6) 

McKay, V.R., Margaret Dolcini, M., Hoffer, L.D.
The dynamics of de-adoption: a case study of policy change, de-adoption, and replacement of an evidence-based HIV intervention
(2017) Translational Behavioral Medicine, 7 (4), pp. 821-831. 

DOI: 10.1007/s13142-017-0493-1


a Center for Mental Health Services Research, Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
b School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
c Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States


Abstract
Evidence-based intervention (EBI) de–adoption and its influence on public health organizations are largely unexplored within public health implementation research. However, a recent shift in support for HIV prevention EBIs by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides an opportunity to explore EBI de–adoption. The current mixed-method study examines EBI de-adoption and the subsequent impact on a community-based organization (CBO) dedicated to HIV prevention. We conducted a case study with a CBO implementing RESPECT, an HIV prevention EBI, over 5 years (2010–2014), but then de­adopted the intervention. We collected archival data documenting RESPECT implementation and conducted two semi­structured interviews with RESPECT staff (N = 5). Using Fixsen and colleagues’ implementation framework, we developed a narrative of RESPECT implementation, delivery, and de­adoption and a thematic analysis to understand additional consequences of RESPECT de-adoption. Discontinuation of RESPECT activities unfolded in a process over time, requiring effort by RESPECT staff. RESPECT de­adoption had wide­reaching influences on individual staff, interactions between the staff and the community, the agency overall, and for implementation of future EBIs. We propose a revision of the implementation framework, incorporating EBI de­adoption as a phase of the implementation cycle. Furthermore, EBI de­adoption may have important, unintended consequences and can inform future HIV prevention strategies and guide research focusing on EBI de-adoption. © 2017, Society of Behavioral Medicine.


Author Keywords
Complex adaptive system;  De-adoption;  De-implementation;  Dissemination and implementation;  Evidence-based intervention;  HIV prevention


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

7) 

Wong, T.T.W., Zhang, R., Zhang, C., Hsu, H.-C., Maslov, K.I., Wang, L., Shi, J., Chen, R., Shung, K.K., Zhou, Q., Wang, L.V.
Label-free automated three-dimensional imaging of whole organs by microtomy-assisted photoacoustic microscopy
(2017) Nature Communications, 8 (1), art. no. 1386, . 

DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01649-3


a Caltech Optical Imaging Laboratory, Andrew and Peggy Cherng Department of Medical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States
b Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
c NIH Resource Center for Medical Ultrasonic Transducer Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
d Roski Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
e Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong


Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging of whole biological organs with microscopic resolution has remained a challenge. Most versions of such imaging techniques require special preparation of the tissue specimen. Here we demonstrate microtomy-assisted photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM) of mouse brains and other organs, which automatically acquires serial distortion-free and registration-free images with endogenous absorption contrasts. Without tissue staining or clearing, mPAM generates micrometer-resolution 3D images of paraffin- or agarose-embedded whole organs with high fidelity, achieved by label-free simultaneous sensing of DNA/RNA, hemoglobins, and lipids. mPAM provides histology-like imaging of cell nuclei, blood vessels, axons, and other anatomical structures, enabling the application of histopathological interpretation at the organelle level to analyze a whole organ. Its deep tissue imaging capability leads to less sectioning, resulting in negligible sectioning artifact. mPAM offers a new way to better understand complex biological organs. © 2017 The Author(s).


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

8) 

Levinson, C.A., Brosof, L.C., Ma, J., Fewell, L., Lenze, E.J.
Fear of food prospectively predicts drive for thinness in an eating disorder sample recently discharged from intensive treatment
(2017) Eating Behaviors, 27, pp. 45-51. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.11.004


a University of Louisville, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, United States
b Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychiatry, United States


Abstract
Fears of food are common in individuals with eating disorders and contribute to the high relapse rates. However, it is unknown how fears of food contribute to eating disorder symptoms across time, potentially contributing to an increased likelihood of relapse. Participants diagnosed with an eating disorder (N = 168) who had recently completed intensive treatment were assessed after discharge and one month later regarding fear of food, eating disorder symptoms, anxiety sensitivity, and negative affect. Cross lagged path analysis was utilized to determine if fear of food predicted subsequent eating disorder symptoms one month later. Fear of food—specifically, anxiety about eating and feared concerns about eating—predicted drive for thinness, a core symptom domain of eating disorders. These relationships held while accounting for anxiety sensitivity and negative affect. There is a specific, direct relationship between anxiety about eating and feared concerns about eating and drive for thinness. Future research should test if interventions designed to target fear of food can decrease drive for thinness and thereby prevent relapse. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Author Keywords
Anorexia nervosa;  Anxiety;  Eating disorders;  Fear of food


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

9) 

Samineni, V.K., Mickle, A.D., Yoon, J., Grajales-Reyes, J.G., Pullen, M.Y., Crawford, K.E., Noh, K.N., Gereau, G.B., Vogt, S.K., Lai, H.H., Rogers, J.A., Gereau, R.W.
Optogenetic silencing of nociceptive primary afferents reduces evoked and ongoing bladder pain
(2017) Scientific Reports, 7 (1), art. no. 15865, . 

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-16129-3


a Washington University Pain Center, Department of Anesthesiology, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave, Box 8054, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States
d Washington University Department of Surgery, Division of Urologic Surgery, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, United States
f Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomed. Eng., Chem., Mech. Eng., Elec. Engineering and Computer Science, and Neurological Surgery, Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Simpson Querrey Institute for Nano/biotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, United States


Abstract
Patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) suffer from chronic pain that severely affects quality of life. Although the underlying pathophysiology is not well understood, inhibition of bladder sensory afferents temporarily relieves pain. Here, we explored the possibility that optogenetic inhibition of nociceptive sensory afferents could be used to modulate bladder pain. The light-activated inhibitory proton pump Archaerhodopsin (Arch) was expressed under control of the sensory neuron-specific sodium channel (sns) gene to selectively silence these neurons. Optically silencing nociceptive sensory afferents significantly blunted the evoked visceromotor response to bladder distension and led to small but significant changes in bladder function. To study of the role of nociceptive sensory afferents in freely behaving mice, we developed a fully implantable, flexible, wirelessly powered optoelectronic system for the long-term manipulation of bladder afferent expressed opsins. We found that optogenetic inhibition of nociceptive sensory afferents reduced both ongoing pain and evoked cutaneous hypersensitivity in the context of cystitis, but had no effect in uninjured, naïve mice. These results suggest that selective optogenetic silencing of nociceptive bladder afferents may represent a potential future therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder pain. © 2017 The Author(s).


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

10) 

Balantekin, K.N., Hayes, J.F., Sheinbein, D.H., Kolko, R.P., Stein, R.I., Saelens, B.E., Hurst, K.T., Welch, R.R., Perri, M.G., Schechtman, K.B., Epstein, L.H., Wilfley, D.E.
Patterns of Eating Disorder Pathology are Associated with Weight Change in Family-Based Behavioral Obesity Treatment
(2017) Obesity, 25 (12), pp. 2115-2122. 

DOI: 10.1002/oby.22028


a Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States
b Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
e Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
f National Center for Weight and Wellness, Washington, DC, United States
g Department of Clinical and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States
h Department of Biostatistics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
i Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, United States


Abstract
Objective: Children with overweight or obesity have elevated eating disorder (ED) pathology, which may increase their risk for clinical EDs. The current study identified patterns of ED pathology in children with overweight or obesity entering family-based behavioral weight loss treatment (FBT) and examined whether children with distinct patterns differed in their ED pathology and BMI z score (zBMI) change across FBT. Methods: Before participating in a 16-session FBT, children (N = 241) completed surveys or interviews assessing ED pathology (emotional eating, shape/weight/eating concerns, restraint, and loss of control [LOC]). Shape and weight concerns (SWC) and LOC were also assessed post treatment. Child height and weight were measured at baseline and post treatment. Latent class analysis identified patterns of ED pathology. Repeated-measures ANOVA examined changes in zBMI and ED pathology. Results: Four patterns of ED pathology were identified: low ED pathology, SWC, only loss of control, and high ED pathology. SWC decreased across treatment, with the highest decreases in patterns characterized by high SWC. All groups experienced significant decreases in zBMI; however, children with the highest ED pathology did not achieve clinically significant weight loss. Conclusions: ED pathology decreased after FBT, decreasing ED risk. While all children achieved zBMI reductions, further research is needed to enhance outcomes for children with high ED pathology. © 2017 The Obesity Society


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

11) 

Hou, P., Eldstrom, J., Shi, J., Zhong, L., McFarland, K., Gao, Y., Fedida, D., Cui, J.
Inactivation of KCNQ1 potassium channels reveals dynamic coupling between voltage sensing and pore opening
(2017) Nature Communications, 8 (1), art. no. 1730, . 

DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01911-8


a Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for the Investigation of Membrane Excitability Diseases, Cardiac Bioelectricity and Arrhythmia Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Anesthesiology Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
c Tencent AI Lab, Shenzhen, China


Abstract
In voltage-activated ion channels, voltage sensor (VSD) activation induces pore opening via VSD-pore coupling. Previous studies show that the pore in KCNQ1 channels opens when the VSD activates to both intermediate and fully activated states, resulting in the intermediate open (IO) and activated open (AO) states, respectively. It is also well known that accompanying KCNQ1 channel opening, the ionic current is suppressed by a rapid process called inactivation. Here we show that inactivation of KCNQ1 channels derives from the different mechanisms of the VSD-pore coupling that lead to the IO and AO states, respectively. When the VSD activates from the intermediate state to the activated state, the VSD-pore coupling has less efficacy in opening the pore, producing inactivation. These results indicate that different mechanisms, other than the canonical VSD-pore coupling, are at work in voltage-dependent ion channel activation. © 2017 The Author(s).


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

12) 

Polimanti, R., Amstadter, A.B., Stein, M.B., Almli, L.M., Baker, D.G., Bierut, L.J., Bradley, B., Farrer, L.A., Johnson, E.O., King, A., Kranzler, H.R., Maihofer, A.X., Rice, J.P., Roberts, A.L., Saccone, N.L., Zhao, H., Liberzon, I., Nievergelt, C.M., Koenen, K.C., Gelernter, J., Duncan, L.E., Chen, C.-Y., Ratanatharathorn, A., Aiello, A.E., Ashley-Koch, A.E., Garrett, M.E., Hauser, M.A., Beckham, J.C., Kimbrel, N.A., Bisson, J., Dalvie, S., Galea, S., Gelernter, J.E., Guffanti, G., Ressler, K.J., Kessler, R.C., Koen, N., Stein, D.J., Logue, M.W., Miller, M.W., Martin, A.R., Morey, R.A., Nugent, N.R., Ripke, S., Smoller, J.W., Sumner, J.A., Uddin, M., Ursano, R.J., Wildman, D.E., Yehuda, R., Daly, M.J.
A putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and posttraumatic stress disorder
(2017) Genome Medicine, 9 (1), art. no. 99, . 

DOI: 10.1186/s13073-017-0491-4


a Yale University School of Medicine and VA CT Healthcare Center, Department of Psychiatry, 116A2, 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT, United States
b Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Psychiatry, Richmond, VA, United States
c University of California San Diego, Department of Psychiatry, La Jolla, CA, United States
d University of California San Diego, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, La Jolla, CA, United States
e Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, La Jolla, CA, United States
f Emory University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Atlanta, GA, United States
g Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, St. Louis, MO, United States
h Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, GA, United States
i Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Biomedical Genetics Division, Boston, MA, United States
j Fellow Program and Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice Division RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
k University of Michigan, Department of Psychiatry, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
l University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and VISN 4 MIRECC, Crescenz VAMC, Department of Psychiatry, Philadelphia, PA, United States
m Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, Boston, MA, United States
n Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Genetics, St. Louis, MO, United States
o Yale University, Department of Biostatistics, New Haven, CT, United States
p VA Ann Arbor Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
q Harvard University, Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge, MA, United States
r McLean Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Belmont, MA, United States
s Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Boston, MA, United States
t Massachusetts General Hospital, Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, and Department of Psychiatry, Boston, MA, United States
u Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Boston, MA, United States
v Yale University School of Medicine, Departments of Neuroscience and of Genetics, New Haven, CT, United States
w Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
x The Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States
y Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States
z Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States
aa Department of Medicine, Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States
ab Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, San Diego, CA, United States
ac Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States
ad Veterans Affairs Durham Healthcare System, Durham, NC, United States
ae Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States
af Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom
ag Division of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
ah Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States
ai Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and VA CT Healthcare System, New Haven, CT, United States
aj RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
ak Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
al Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
am MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa
an VA Boston Healthcare System, Jamaica Plain, MA, United States
ao Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States
ap Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States
aq Division of Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States
ar Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, United States
as Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO, United States
at Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité, Campus Mitte, Berlin, Germany
au Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Cambridge, MA, United States
av Department of Genetics, Washington University, St Louis, MO, United States
aw Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States
ax Center for Cardiovascular Behavioral Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States
ay Department of Psychology and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States
az Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, United States
ba Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States
bb James J. Peters Bronx Veterans Affairs and Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY, United States
bc Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY, United States
bd Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Cambridge, MA, United States


Abstract
Background: The nature and underlying mechanisms of the observed increased vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women are unclear. Methods: We investigated the genetic overlap of PTSD with anthropometric traits and reproductive behaviors and functions in women. The analysis was conducted using female-specific summary statistics from large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a cohort of 3577 European American women (966 PTSD cases and 2611 trauma-exposed controls). We applied a high-resolution polygenic score approach and Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate genetic correlations and causal relationships. Results: We observed an inverse association of PTSD with genetically determined anthropometric traits related to body shape, independent of body mass index (BMI). The top association was related to BMI-adjusted waist circumference (WCadj; R = -0.079, P < 0.001, Q = 0.011). We estimated a relative decrease of 64.6% (95% confidence interval = 27.5-82.7) in the risk of PTSD per 1-SD increase in WCadj. MR-Egger regression intercept analysis showed no evidence of pleiotropic effects in this association (Ppleiotropy = 0.979). We also observed associations of genetically determined WCadj with age at first sexual intercourse and number of sexual partners (P = 0.013 and P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: There is a putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and PTSD, which could be mediated by evolutionary mechanisms involved in human sexual behaviors. © 2017 The Author(s).


Author Keywords
Anthropometric traits;  Genetics;  Trauma;  Women


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

13) 

Tan, C.H., Fan, C.C., Mormino, E.C., Sugrue, L.P., Broce, I.J., Hess, C.P., Dillon, W.P., Bonham, L.W., Yokoyama, J.S., Karch, C.M., Brewer, J.B., Rabinovici, G.D., Miller, B.L., Schellenberg, G.D., Kauppi, K., Feldman, H.A., Holland, D., McEvoy, L.K., Hyman, B.T., Bennett, D.A., Andreassen, O.A., Dale, A.M., Desikan, R.S., For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
Polygenic hazard score: an enrichment marker for Alzheimer’s associated amyloid and tau deposition
(2017) Acta Neuropathologica, pp. 1-9. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1789-4


a Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States
b Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, United States
c Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
d Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States
e Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
f Department of Neurosciences, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, United States
g Department of Radiology, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, United States
h Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, United States
i Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
j Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States
k Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States
l NORMENT Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
m Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway


Abstract
There is an urgent need for identifying nondemented individuals at the highest risk of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia. Here, we evaluated whether a recently validated polygenic hazard score (PHS) can be integrated with known in vivo cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or positron emission tomography (PET) biomarkers of amyloid, and CSF tau pathology to prospectively predict cognitive and clinical decline in 347 cognitive normal (CN; baseline age range = 59.7–90.1, 98.85% white) and 599 mild cognitively impaired (MCI; baseline age range = 54.4–91.4, 98.83% white) individuals from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1, GO, and 2. We further investigated the association of PHS with post-mortem amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles in the Religious Orders Study and Memory and Aging Project (ROSMAP) cohort (N = 485, age at death range = 71.3–108.3). In CN and MCI individuals, we found that amyloid and total tau positivity systematically varies as a function of PHS. For individuals in greater than the 50th percentile PHS, the positive predictive value for amyloid approached 100%; for individuals in less than the 25th percentile PHS, the negative predictive value for total tau approached 85%. High PHS individuals with amyloid and tau pathology showed the steepest longitudinal cognitive and clinical decline, even among APOE ε4 noncarriers. Among the CN subgroup, we similarly found that PHS was strongly associated with amyloid positivity and the combination of PHS and biomarker status significantly predicted longitudinal clinical progression. In the ROSMAP cohort, higher PHS was associated with higher post-mortem amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles, even in APOE ε4 noncarriers. Together, our results show that even after accounting for APOE ε4 effects, PHS may be useful in MCI and preclinical AD therapeutic trials to enrich for biomarker-positive individuals at highest risk for short-term clinical progression. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature


Author Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease;  Amyloid;  Polygenic risk;  Tau


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

14) 

Aleem, A.W., Wilent, W.B., Narzikul, A.C., Kuntz, A.F., Chang, E.S., Williams, G.R., Abboud, J.A.
Incidence of peripheral nerve injury during shoulder arthroplasty when motor evoked potentials are monitored
(2017) Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, pp. 1-10. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s10877-017-0080-5


a Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8233, St. Louis, MO, United States
b The Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States
c SpecialtyCare, Nashville, TN, United States
d Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
e Inova Health System, Fairfax, VA, United States


Abstract
To report the incidence of clinically detectable nerve injuries when utilizing transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during shoulder arthroplasty. A retrospective review of patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty with continuous IONM was performed. The criteria for nerve alerts was an 80% amplitude reduction in MEPs. The primary outcome measure was post-operative clinically detectable nerve deficit. An additional retrospective analysis on a subset of cases using an all-or-none (100% amplitude reduction) criterion applied to the deltoid was performed. Two hundred eighty four arthroplasty cases were included. There were no permanent post-operative nerve injuries and two transient nerve injuries (0.7%). MEP alerts occurred in 102 cases (36.2%). Nineteen (6.7%) cases did not have signals return above alert threshold at closure. These cases were significantly associated with post-operative nerve injury (p = 0.03). There were no false negatives, making sensitivity 100% and specificity was 93.9%. In the subset of cases in which an all-or-none criterion was retrospectively applied to just the deltoid, MEP alerts occurred in just 17.9% of cases; specificity improved to 98.0%. We conclude that utilization of the real-time diagnostic MEP data during shoulder arthroplasty aids surgeons in decision making regarding impending peripheral nerve injuries. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature


Author Keywords
Intraoperative motor evoked potentials;  Nerve injury;  Peripheral nerve function;  Peripheral nerve monitoring;  Shoulder arthroplasty


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

15) 

Ben-Shahar, Y.
Epigenetic switch turns on genetic behavioral variations
(2017) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114 (47), pp. 12365-12367. 

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1717376114


Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States


Document Type: Note
Source: Scopus

 

16) 

Sharma, A.K., Schultz, J.W., Prior, J.T., Rath, N.P., Mirica, L.M.
Coordination Chemistry of Bifunctional Chemical Agents Designed for Applications in 64Cu PET Imaging for Alzheimer's Disease
(2017) Inorganic Chemistry, 56 (22), pp. 13801-13814. 

DOI: 10.1021/acs.inorgchem.7b01883


a Department of Chemistry, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri St. Louis, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Positron emission tomography (PET) is emerging as one of the most important diagnostic tools for brain imaging, yet the most commonly used radioisotopes in PET imaging, 11C and 18F, have short half-lives, and their usage is thus somewhat limited. By comparison, the 64Cu radionuclide has a half-life of 12.7 h, which is ideal for administering and imaging purposes. In spite of appreciable research efforts, high-affinity copper chelators suitable for brain imaging applications are still lacking. Herein, we present the synthesis and characterization of a series of bifunctional compounds (BFCs) based on macrocyclic 1,4,7-triazacyclononane and 2,11-diaza[3.3](2,6)pyridinophane ligand frameworks that exhibit a high affinity for Cu2+ ions. In addition, these BFCs contain a 2-phenylbenzothiazole fragment that is known to interact tightly with amyloid β fibrillar aggregates. Determination of the protonation constants (pKa values) and stability constants (log β values) of these BFCs, as well as characterization of the isolated copper complexes using X-ray crystallography, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electrochemical studies, suggests that these BFCs exhibit desirable properties for the development of novel 64Cu PET imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

17) 

Fredericksen, J., Fabbre, V.
Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Issues and Implications for Social Work Practice
(2017) Journal of Gerontological Social Work, pp. 1-7. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1080/01634372.2017.1393480


George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St. Louis, United States


Abstract
Owing to recent medical advancements, people with Down Syndrome (DS) are now able to live considerably longer lives and thus experience a variety of complex issues as they age. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) frequently occurs in older adults who have DS, but few practice guidelines exist to inform social work practice with older adults who have this dual diagnosis. This commentary will highlight the connection between these two conditions within a neurobiological framework and discuss implications for practice based on the available literature on this intersection of ability status, cognitive status, and age. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC


Author Keywords
Alzheimer’s Disease;  Down Syndrome;  Social Work Practice


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

18) 

Spangler, S., Bruchas, M.R.
Tuning Biased GPCR Signaling for Physiological Gain
(2017) Cell, 171 (5), pp. 989-991. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.10.046


b Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Effective and safe doses of opiate painkillers, like morphine, can be limited by respiratory depression. Schmid et al. (2017) now present a quantitative method to design ligands and correlate GPCR signaling bias to the dose separation between therapeutic and adverse effects in animals. Effective and safe doses of opiate painkillers, like morphine, can be limited by respiratory depression. Schmid et al. (2017) now present a quantitative method to design ligands and correlate GPCR signaling bias to the dose separation between therapeutic and adverse effects in animals. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Document Type: Short Survey
Source: Scopus

 

19) 

Lin, A.J., Campian, J.L., Hui, C., Rudra, S., Rao, Y.J., Thotala, D., Hallahan, D., Huang, J.
Impact of concurrent versus adjuvant chemotherapy on the severity and duration of lymphopenia in glioma patients treated with radiation therapy
(2017) Journal of Neuro-Oncology, pp. 1-9. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s11060-017-2668-5


a Department of Radiation Oncology, Center for Advanced Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box #8224, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Prolonged severe lymphopenia has been shown to persist beyond a year in glioma patients after radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy. This study examines the differential impact of concurrent versus adjuvant chemotherapy on lymphopenia after RT. WHO grade II–III glioma patients who received RT with concurrent and/or adjuvant chemotherapy from 2007 to 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was temozolomide (TMZ), and adjuvant chemotherapy was either TMZ or procarbazine/lomustine/vincristine (PCV). Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was analyzed at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after the start of RT. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify the clinical variables in predicting acute or late lymphopenia. There were 151 patients with evaluable ALC: 91 received concurrent and adjuvant TMZ (CRT + ADJ), 32 received only concurrent TMZ (CRT), and 28 received only adjuvant TMZ or PCV (ADJ). There were 9 (10%) versus 6 (19%) versus 0 (0%) cases of grade 3 lymphopenia (ALC < 500/mm3) at 6 weeks and 4 (6%) versus 0 (0%) versus 3 (17%) cases at 12 months in CRT + ADJ, CRT and ADJ groups, respectively. On multivariable analyses, concurrent chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR] 72.3, p < 0.001), female sex (OR 10.8, p < 0.001), and older age (OR 1.06, p = 0.002) were the most significant predictors for any grade ≥ 1 lymphopenia (ALC < 1000/mm3) at 1.5 months. Older age (OR 1.08, p = 0.02) and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 1.19, p = 0.003) were significantly associated with grade ≥ 1 lymphopenia at 12 months. Thus, concurrent chemotherapy appears as the dominant contributor to the severity of acute lymphopenia after RT in WHO grade II–III glioma patients, and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy appears as the key factor to prolonged lymphopenia. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature


Author Keywords
Adjuvant chemotherapy;  Concurrent chemotherapy;  Glioma;  Lymphopenia;  Radiation therapy


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

20) 

Kafashan, M.M., Ryu, S., Hargis, M.J., Laurido-Soto, O., Roberts, D.E., Thontakudi, A., Eisenman, L., Kummer, T.T., Ching, S.N.
EEG dynamical correlates of focal and diffuse causes of coma
(2017) BMC Neurology, 17 (1), art. no. 197, . 

DOI: 10.1186/s12883-017-0977-0


a Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, 1 Brookings Dr. Campus Box 1042, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, 660 S Euclid Ave. Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Washington University in St. Louis, Division of Biology and Biomedical Science, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
e Department of Neurology, Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, United States
f University of Rochester, Department of Neurology, Rochester, United States


Abstract
Background: Rapidly determining the causes of a depressed level of consciousness (DLOC) including coma is a common clinical challenge. Quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) has the potential to improve DLOC assessment by providing readily deployable, temporally detailed characterization of brain activity in such patients. While used commonly for seizure detection, EEG-based assessment of DLOC etiology is less well-established. As a first step towards etiological diagnosis, we sought to distinguish focal and diffuse causes of DLOC through assessment of temporal dynamics within EEG signals. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed EEG recordings from 40 patients with DLOC with consensus focal or diffuse culprit pathology. For each recording, we performed a suite of time-series analyses, then used a statistical framework to identify which analyses (features) could be used to distinguish between focal and diffuse cases. Results: Using cross-validation approaches, we identified several spectral and non-spectral EEG features that were significantly different between DLOC patients with focal vs. diffuse etiologies, enabling EEG-based classification with an accuracy of 76%. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that DLOC due to focal vs. diffuse injuries differ along several electrophysiological parameters. These results may form the basis of future classification strategies for DLOC and coma that are more etiologically-specific and therefore therapeutically-relevant. © 2017 The Author(s).


Author Keywords
Classification;  Coma;  Depressed level of consciousness;  Electroencephalogram


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

21) 

Kornfield, S.L., Kang-Yi, C.D., Mandell, D.S., Epperson, C.N.
Predictors and Patterns of Psychiatric Treatment Dropout During Pregnancy Among Low-Income Women
(2017) Maternal and Child Health Journal, pp. 1-11. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s10995-017-2394-9


a Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Psychiatry, Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 3535 Market Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA, United States
c University of Pennsylvania Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, 3535 Market Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA, United States
d The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Center for Autism Research, University of Pennsylvania Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, 3535 Market Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA, United States
e Penn PROMOTES Research on Sex and Gender in Health, Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA, United States


Abstract
Objective This study compared psychiatric treatment discontinuation rates among pregnant women using psychotropic medications, outpatient psychotherapy, or both before conception. Methods Using data from Pennsylvania Medicaid Fee-For-Service and Managed Care Organization claims and Medicaid enrollment, 3030 women were identified who gave birth between 2007 and 2009, had ≥ 1 claim for psychiatric treatment during the 120 days prior to pregnancy, and were enrolled in Medicaid until they delivered. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate psychiatric treatment dropout rate during pregnancy and examine relationships between treatment dropout and age, race/ethnicity, and pre-pregnancy psychiatric diagnosis and treatment pattern. Results After the first trimester, the probability of discontinuing psychotropic medications was 83 versus 37.8% for cessation of psychotherapy among combined treatment users. Two or more psychotherapy sessions in the 4 months prior to pregnancy were associated with decreased psychotherapy dropout during pregnancy. Psychotherapy during pregnancy was associated with prenatal psychotropic medication adherence. Conclusions To retain women in treatment during pregnancy, when discontinuation from care is common, innovative models of care should consider type of pre-pregnancy mental healthcare and individual characteristics. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC


Author Keywords
Maternal psychiatric disorders;  Prenatal mental health;  Psychiatric treatment dropout


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

22) 

Lam Shin Cheung, V., Kim, A., Sahgal, A., Das, S.
Meningioma recurrence rates following treatment: a systematic analysis
(2017) Journal of Neuro-Oncology, pp. 1-11. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s11060-017-2659-6


a Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University and London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
b Department of Neurosurgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
d Keenan Research Centre and Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
e University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada


Abstract
Recurrence rates of meningiomas have been widely reported in the literature, but it remains challenging for clinicians to predict recurrence rate depending on treatment, patient demographics and tumor characteristics. To address these needs, we performed a systematic analysis of the literature to determine the recurrence rate ranges of meningiomas following surgery or radiation. Our search yielded 13 studies that met all criteria for inclusion, allowing us to include 1539 patients in the assessment. Recurrence rates ranged from 0.00 to 2.36 per 100-person-years for WHO grade I meningiomas; and from 7.35 to 11.46 per 100-person-years for WHO grade II meningiomas. Our findings suggest that (1) reported recurrence rates are variable and complicated by the heterogeneity of study populations; (2) as expected, WHO grade II meningiomas generally have a higher recurrence rate than WHO grade I, when controlling for time of diagnosis (by employing person-years); and (3) there is a need for more rigorous reporting of recurrence rates, WHO grade, and Simpson grading for individual patients in order to determine a robust mean of recurrence across WHO grades. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC


Author Keywords
Meningioma;  Microsurgery;  Radiation;  Recurrence


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

23) 

Ibanez, L., Dube, U., Saef, B., Budde, J., Black, K., Medvedeva, A., Del-Aguila, J.L., Davis, A.A., Perlmutter, J.S., Harari, O., Benitez, B.A., Cruchaga, C.
Parkinson disease polygenic risk score is associated with Parkinson disease status and age at onset but not with alpha-synuclein cerebrospinal fluid levels
(2017) BMC Neurology, 17 (1), art. no. 198, . 

DOI: 10.1186/s12883-017-0978-z


a Washington University in Saint Louis, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
b Washington University in Saint Louis, Hope Center Program on Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration, Saint Louis, MO, United States
c Washington University in Saint Louis, Medical Scientist Training Program, School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
d Washington University in St Louis, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
e Washington University in Saint Louis, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Background: The genetic architecture of Parkinson's Disease (PD) is complex and not completely understood. Multiple genetic studies to date have identified multiple causal genes and risk loci. Nevertheless, most of the expected genetic heritability remains unexplained. Polygenic risk scores (PRS) may provide greater statistical power and inform about the genetic architecture of multiple phenotypes. The aim of this study was to test the association between PRS and PD risk, age at onset and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (α-synuclein, Aβ1-42, t-tau and p-tau). Methods: The weighted PRS was created using the genome-wide loci from Nalls et al., 2014 PD GWAs meta-analysis. The PRS was tested for association with PD status, age at onset and CSF biomarker levels in 829 cases and 432 controls of European ancestry. Results: The PRS was associated with PD status (p = 5.83×10-08) and age at onset (p = 5.70×10-07). The CSF t-tau levels showed a nominal association with the PRS (p = 0.02). However, CSF α-synuclein, amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau were not found to be associated with the PRS. Conclusion: Our study suggests that there is an overlap in the genetic architecture of PD risk and onset, although the different loci present different weights for those phenotypes. In our dataset we found a marginal association of the PRS with CSF t-tau but not with α-synuclein CSF levels, suggesting that the genetic architecture for the CSF biomarker levels is different from that of PD risk. © 2017 The Author(s).


Author Keywords
Age at onset;  Biomarkers;  Genetics;  Parkinson disease;  Polygenic risk score


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

24) 

Carlozzi, N.E., Hahn, E.A., Frank, S.A., Perlmutter, J.S., Downing, N.D., McCormack, M.K., Barton, S., Nance, M.A., Schilling, S.G., Hdqlife Site Investigators And Coordinators, Carlozzi, N., Dayalu, P., Schilling, S., Austin, A., Canter, M., Goodnight, S., Miner, J., Migliore, N., Paulsen, J., Downing, N., DeSoriano, I., Shadrick, C., Miller, A., Quaid, K., Wesson, M., Ross, C., Churchill, G., Ong, M.J., Perlman, S., Clemente, B., Fisher, A., Obialisi, G., Rosco, M., McCormack, M., Marin, H., Dicke, A., Perlmutter, J.S., Barton, S., Smith, S., Nance, M., Ede, P., Rao, S., Ahmed, A., Lengen, M., Mourany, L., Reece, C., Geschwind, M., Winer, J., Cella, D., Gershon, R., Hahn, E., Lai, J.-S.
A new measure for end of life planning, preparation, and preferences in Huntington disease: HDQLIFE end of life planning
(2017) Journal of Neurology, pp. 1-10. Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-017-8677-7


a Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, North Campus Research Complex, 2800 Plymouth Road, Building NCRC B14, Room G216, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
b Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States
c Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States
d Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Departments of Radiology and Neuroscience, Program in Occupational Therapy and Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States
f Forensic Health Care College of Nursing, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States
g Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Brunswick, NJ, United States
h Piscataway and Department of Pathology, Rowan University-SOM, Stratford, NJ, United States
i Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, United States
j Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States


Abstract
Background: Huntington disease is a fatal inherited neurodegenerative disease. Because the end result of Huntington disease is death due to Huntington disease-related causes, there is a need for better understanding and caring for individuals at their end of life. Aim: The purpose of this study was to develop a new measure to evaluate end of life planning. Design: We conducted qualitative focus groups, solicited expert input, and completed a literature review to develop a 16-item measure to evaluate important aspects of end of life planning for Huntington disease. Item response theory and differential item functioning analyses were utilized to examine the psychometric properties of items; exploratory factor analysis was used to establish meaningful subscales. Participants: Participants included 508 individuals with pre-manifest or manifest Huntington disease. Results: Item response theory supported the retention of all 16 items on the huntington disease quality of life (“HDQLIFE”) end of life planning measure. Exploratory factor analysis supported a four-factor structure: legal planning, financial planning, preferences for hospice care, and preferences for conditions (locations, surroundings, etc.) at the time of death. Although a handful of items exhibited some evidence of differential item functioning, these items were retained due to their relevant clinical content. The final 16-item scale includes an overall total score and four subscale scores that reflect the different end of life planning constructs. Conclusions: The 16-item HDQLIFE end of life planning measure demonstrates adequate psychometric properties; it may be a useful tool for clinicians to clarify patients’ preferences about end of life care. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature


Author Keywords
End of life;  HDQLIFE;  HDQLIFE Site Investigators and Coordinators;  Health-related quality of life;  Huntington disease;  Patient-reported outcome (PRO)


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

25) 

Lin, M., Liu, S.B., Genin, G.M., Zhu, Y., Shi, M., Ji, C., Li, A., Lu, T.J., Xu, F.
Melting Away Pain: Decay of Thermal Nociceptor Transduction during Heat-Induced Irreversible Desensitization of Ion Channels
(2017) ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, 3 (11), pp. 3029-3035. Cited 1 time.

DOI: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00789


a Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, College of Stomatology, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
b Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center, College of Stomatology, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
c Key Laboratory of Shaanxi Province for Craniofacial Precision Medicine Research, College of Stomatology, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
d Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University, School of Medicine, NSF Science and Technology Center for Engineering Mechanobiology, School of Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Acupuncture, Shaanxi Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xi'an, China


Abstract
Thermal transient receptor potential channels play a key role in thermal sensation. Although predictive models exist for temperature-dependent transduction through these channels and for the associated sensations of pain, the ability to predict irreversible desensitization has been lacking. We explored the role of irreversible ion channel desensitization in pain sensation and hypothesized that desensitization of ion channels would follow the kinetics similar to the denaturation of catalytic enzymes. We therefore proposed a three-state model to simulate the kinetic of temperature-sensitive ion channels from the closed state through opening and irreversible thermal desensitization. We tested the model against data obtained in vivo from a feline model. The theoretical model predicts all experimental data with reasonable accuracy, and represents an important step toward the ability for understanding of the molecular basis of nociceptor signaling providing the possibility to design local anesthesia regimens and to the prediction of postoperative pain. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Author Keywords
Irreversible desensitization;  Temperature-sensitive ion channels;  Thermal pain;  Trans-membrane ion transport


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

26) 

Mitra, A., Snyder, A.Z., Tagliazucchi, E., Laufs, H., Elison, J., Emerson, R.W., Shen, M.D., Wolff, J.J., Botteron, K.N., Dager, S., Estes, A.M., Evans, A., Gerig, G., Hazlett, H.C., Paterson, S.J., Schultz, R.T., Styner, M.A., Zwaigenbaum, L., Chappell, C., Estes, A., Shaw, D., Botteron, K., McKinstry, R., Constantino, J., Pruett, J., Schultz, R., Paterson, S., Evans, A.C., Collins, D.L., Pike, G.B., Fonov, V., Kostopoulos, P., Das, S., Styner, M., Gu, H., Schlaggar, B.L., Piven, J., Pruett, J.R., Jr., Raichle, M.
Resting-state fMRI in sleeping infants more closely resembles adult sleep than adult wakefulness
(2017) PLoS ONE, 12 (11), art. no. e0188122, . 

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0188122


a Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
c Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
d Department of Neurology, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany
e Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States
f Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States
g Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
h Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
i Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
j Department of Psychiatry, New York University, New York, NY, United States
k Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
l Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
m Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
n University of North Carolina, United States
o IBIS Network PI, United States
p University of Washington, United States
q Washington University, United States
r Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, United States
s University of Alberta, Canada
t University of Minnesota, United States
u Data Coordinating Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, Canada
v Image Processing Core, New York University, United States
w University of North Carolina, United States
x Statistical Analysis Core, United States


Abstract
Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in infants enables important studies of functional brain organization early in human development. However, rs-fMRI in infants has universally been obtained during sleep to reduce participant motion artifact, raising the question of whether differences in functional organization between awake adults and sleeping infants that are commonly attributed to development may instead derive, at least in part, from sleep. This question is especially important as rs-fMRI differences in adult wake vs. sleep are well documented. To investigate this question, we compared functional connectivity and BOLD signal propagation patterns in 6, 12, and 24 month old sleeping infants with patterns in adult wakefulness and non-REM sleep. We find that important functional connectivity features seen during infant sleep closely resemble those seen during adult sleep, including reduced default mode network functional connectivity. However, we also find differences between infant and adult sleep, especially in thalamic BOLD signal propagation patterns. These findings highlight the importance of considering sleep state when drawing developmental inferences in infant rs-fMRI. © 2017 Mitra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

27) 

Sahrmann, S., Azevedo, D.C., Dillen, L.V.
Diagnosis and treatment of movement system impairment syndromes
(2017) Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 21 (6), pp. 391-399. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.08.001


a Washington University School of Medicine, Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, United States
b Universidade Cidade de São Paulo (UNICID), Masters and Doctoral Programs in Physical Therapy, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
c Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Departamento de Fisioterapia, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil


Abstract
Background Diagnoses and treatments based on movement system impairment syndromes were developed to guide physical therapy treatment. Objectives This masterclass aims to describe the concepts on that are the basis of the syndromes and treatment and to provide the current research on movement system impairment syndromes. Results The conceptual basis of the movement system impairment syndromes is that sustained alignment in a non-ideal position and repeated movements in a specific direction are thought to be associated with several musculoskeletal conditions. Classification into movement system impairment syndromes and treatment has been described for all body regions. The classification involves interpreting data from standardized tests of alignments and movements. Treatment is based on correcting the impaired alignment and movement patterns as well as correcting the tissue adaptations associated with the impaired alignment and movement patterns. The reliability and validity of movement system impairment syndromes have been partially tested. Although several case reports involving treatment using the movement system impairment syndromes concept have been published, efficacy of treatment based on movement system impairment syndromes has not been tested in randomized controlled trials, except in people with chronic low back pain. © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia


Author Keywords
Classification;  Impairment;  Movement system;  Musculoskeletal;  Pain;  Rehabilitation


Document Type: Review
Source: Scopus

 

28) 

Karadaghy, O.A., Hong, H., Scott-Wittenborn, N., Sinha, P., Suko, J., Tait, S., Wamkpah, N.S., Kallogjeri, D., Piccirillo, J.F.
Reporting of effect size and confidence intervals in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
(2017) JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 143 (11), pp. 1075-1080. 

DOI: 10.1001/jamaoto.2017.1504


a University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, United States
b Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
IMPORTANCE: Effect sizes and confidence intervals (CIs) are critical for the interpretation of the results for any outcome of interest. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of reporting effect sizes and CIs in the results of analytical studies. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Descriptive review of analytical studies published from January 2012 to December 2015 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. METHODS: A random sample of 121 articles was reviewed in this study. Descriptive studies were excluded from the analysis. Seven independent reviewers participated in the evaluation of the articles, with 2 reviewers assigned per article. The review process was standardized for each article; the Methods and Results sections were reviewed for the outcomes of interest. Descriptive statistics for each outcome were calculated and reported accordingly. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes of interest included the presence of effect size and associated CIs. Secondary outcomes of interest included a priori descriptions of statistical methodology, power analysis, and expectation of effect size. RESULTS: There were 107 articles included for analysis. The majority of the articles were retrospective cohort studies (n = 36 [36%]) followed by cross-sectional studies (n = 18 [17%]). A total of 58 articles (55%) reported an effect size for an outcome of interest. The most common effect size used was difference of mean, followed by odds ratio and correlation coefficient, which were reported 17 (16%), 15 (13%), and 12 times (11%), respectively. Confidence intervals were associated with 29 of these effect sizes (27%), and 9 of these articles (8%) included interpretation of the CI. A description of the statistical methodology was provided in 97 articles (91%), while 5 (5%) provided an a priori power analysis and 8 (7%) provided a description of expected effect size finding. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Improving results reporting is necessary to enhance the reader’s ability to interpret the results of any given study. This can only be achieved through increasing the reporting of effect sizes and CIs rather than relying on P values for both statistical significance and clinically meaningful results. © 2017 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

29) 

Wenrich, K.A., Davidson, L.S., Uchanski, R.M.
Segmental and suprasegmental perception in children using hearing AIDS
(2017) Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 28 (10), pp. 901-912. 

DOI: 10.3766/jaaa.16105


a Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Program in Audiology and Communication Science, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Background: Suprasegmental perception (perception of stress, intonation, ‘‘how something is said’’ and ‘‘who says it’’) and segmental speech perception (perception of individual phonemes or perception of ‘‘what is said’’) are perceptual abilities that provide the foundation for the development of spoken language and effective communication. While there are numerous studies examining segmental perception in children with hearing aids (HAs), there are far fewer studies examining suprasegmental perception, especially for children with greater degrees of residual hearing. Examining the relation between acoustic hearing thresholds, and both segmental and suprasegmental perception for children with HAs, may ultimately enable better device recommendations (bilateral HAs, bimodal devices [one CI and one HA in opposite ears], bilateral CIs) for a particular degree of residual hearing. Examining both types of speech perception is important because segmental and suprasegmental cues are affected differentially by the type of hearing device(s) used (i.e., cochlear implant [CI] and/or HA). Additionally, suprathreshold measures, such as frequency resolution ability, may partially predict benefit from amplification and may assist audiologists in making hearing device recommendations. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between audibility (via hearing thresholds and speech intelligibility indices), and segmental and suprasegmental speech perception for children with HAs. A secondary goal is to explore the relationships among frequency resolution ability (via spectral modulation detection [SMD] measures), segmental and suprasegmental speech perception, and receptive language in these same children. Research Design: A prospective cross-sectional design. Study Sample: Twenty-three children, ages 4 yr 11 mo to 11 yr 11 mo, participated in the study. Participants were recruited from pediatric clinic populations, oral schools for the deaf, and mainstream schools. Data Collection and Analysis: Audiological history and hearing device information were collected from participants and their families. Segmental and suprasegmental speech perception, SMD, and receptive vocabulary skills were assessed. Correlations were calculated to examine the significance (p, 0.05) of relations between audibility and outcome measures. Results: Measures of audibility and segmental speech perception are not significantly correlated, while low-frequency pure-tone average (unaided) is significantly correlated with suprasegmental speech perception. SMD is significantly correlated with all measures (measures of audibility, segmental and suprasegmental perception and vocabulary). Lastly, although age is not significantly correlated with measures of audibility, it is significantly correlated with all other outcome measures. Conclusions: The absence of a significant correlation between audibility and segmental speech perception might be attributed to overall audibility being maximized through well-fit HAs. The significant correlation between low-frequency unaided audibility and suprasegmental measures is likely due to the strong, predominantly low-frequency nature of suprasegmental acoustic properties. Frequency resolution ability, via SMD performance, is significantly correlated with all outcomes and requires further investigation; its significant correlation with vocabulary suggests that linguistic ability may be partially related to frequency resolution ability. Last, all of the outcome measures are significantly correlated with age, suggestive of developmental effects.


Author Keywords
Hearing AIDS;  Hearing loss;  Pediatric;  Spectral resolution;  Speech perception;  Suprasegmental


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

30) 

Flaherty, L.B., Wood, T., Cheng, A., Khan, A.R.
Pre-existing psychological depression confers increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes following cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis
(2017) Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 154 (5), pp. 1578-1586.e1. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2017.06.052


a Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville School of Arts and Sciences, Louisville, Ky, United States
b Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Ky, United States
c Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo, United States


Document Type: Editorial
Source: Scopus

 

31) 

Schoppy, D.W., Rhoads, K.F., Ma, Y., Chen, M.M., Nussenbaum, B., Orosco, R.K., Rosenthal, E.L., Divi, V.
Measuring institutional quality in head and neck surgery using hospital-level data: Negative margin rates and neck dissection yield
(2017) JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 143 (11), pp. 1111-1116. 

DOI: 10.1001/jamaoto.2017.1694


a Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, United States
b Motility Doc, San Jose, CA, United States
c Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
IMPORTANCE: Negative margins and lymph node yields (LNY) of 18 or more from neck dissections in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have been associated with improved patient survival. It is unclear whether these metrics can be used to identify hospitals with improved outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 2 patient-level metrics would predict outcomes at the hospital level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective review of records from the National Cancer Database (NCDB) was used to identify patients who underwent primary surgery and concurrent neck dissection for HNSCC between 2004 and 2013. The percentage of patients at each hospital with negative margins on primary resection and an LNY 18 or more from a neck dissection was quantified. Cox proportional hazard models were used to define the association between hospital performance on these metrics and overall survival. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Margin status and lymph node yield at hospital level. Overall survival (OS). RESULTS: We identified 1008 hospitals in the NCDB where 64 738 patients met inclusion criteria. Of the 64 738 participants, 45 170 (69.8%) were men and 19 568 (30.2%) were women. The mean SD age of included patients was 60.5 (12.0) years. Patients treated at hospitals attaining the combined metric of a 90% or higher negative margin rate and 80% or more of cases with LNYs of 18 or more experienced a significant reduction in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.98). This benefit in survival was independent of the patient-level improvement associated with negative margins (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.71-0.76) and LNY of 18 or more (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.83-0.88). Including these metrics in the model neutralized the association of traditional measures of hospital quality (volume and teaching status). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment at hospitals that attain a high rate of negative margins and LNY of 18 or more is associated with improved survival in patients undergoing surgery for HNSCC. These surgical outcome measures predicted outcomes independent of traditional, but generally nonmodifiable characteristics. Tracking of these metrics may help identify high-quality centers and provide guidance for institution-level quality improvement. © 2017 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

32) 

Wen, J., Yablonskiy, D.A., Salter, A., Cross, A.H.
Limbic system damage in MS: MRI assessment and correlations with clinical testing
(2017) PLoS ONE, 12 (11), art. no. e0187915, . 

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187915


a Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Volume loss in some limbic region structures has been observed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, in vivo evaluation of existing tissue cellular microstructure integrity has received less attention. The goal of studies reported here was to quantitatively assess loss of limbic system volumes and tissue integrity, and to evaluate associations of these measures with cognitive and physical dysfunction in MS patients. Thirty-one healthy controls (HC) and 80 MS patients, including 32 relapsing remitting (RRMS), 32 secondary progressive (SPMS) and 16 primary progressive (PPMS), participated in this study. Tissue cellular integrity was evaluated by means of recently introduced tissue-specific parameter R2t* that was calculated from multi-gradient-echo MRI signals using a recently developed method that separates R2t* from BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contributions to GRE signal decay rate constant (R2*), and accounting for physiological fluctuations and artifacts from background gradients. Volumes in limbic system regions, normalized to skull size (NV), were measured from standard MPRAGE images. MS patients had lower R2t* and smaller normalized volumes in the hippocampus, amygdala, and several other limbic system regions, compared to HC. Alterations in R2t* of several limbic system regions correlated with clinical and neurocognitive test scores in MS patients. In contrast, smaller normalized volumes in MS were only correlated with neurocognitive test scores in the hippocampus and amygdala. This study reports the novel finding that R2t*, a measure that estimates tissue integrity, is more sensitive to tissue damage in limbic system structures than is atrophy. R2t* measurements can serve as a biomarker that is distinct from and complementary to volume measurements. © 2017 Wen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

33) 

Policeni, B., Corey, A.S., Burns, J., Conley, D.B., Crowley, R.W., Harvey, H.B., Hoang, J., Hunt, C.H., Jagadeesan, B.D., Juliano, A.F., Kennedy, T.A., Moonis, G., Pannell, J.S., Patel, N.D., Perlmutter, J.S., Rosenow, J.M., Schroeder, J.W., Whitehead, M.T., Cornelius, R.S.
ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Cranial Neuropathy
(2017) Journal of the American College of Radiology, 14 (11), pp. S406-S420. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.jacr.2017.08.035


a Principal Author and Panel Vice Chair, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
b Panel Chair, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
c Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
d Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chicago, Illinois, United States
e Rush University Medical Center, neurosurgical consultant, Chicago, Illinois, United States
f Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
g Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States
h Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
i University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
j Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
k University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinic, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
l Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
m University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California, United States
n Fairfax Radiology Consultants PC, Fairfax, Virginia, United States
o Washington University School of Medicine, American Academy of Neurology, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
p Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois neurosurgical consultant, United States
q Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
r Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
s Specialty Chair, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States


Abstract
Evaluation of cranial neuropathy can be complex given the different pathway of each cranial nerve as well as the associated anatomic landmarks. Radiological evaluation requires imaging of the entire course of the nerve from its nucleus to the end organ. MRI is the modality of choice with CT playing a complementary role, particularly in the evaluation of the bone anatomy. Since neoplastic and inflammatory lesions are prevalent on the differential diagnosis, contrast enhanced studies are preferred when possible. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidencebased guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. © 2017 American College of Radiology


Author Keywords
Appropriate Use Criteria;  Appropriateness Criteria;  AUC;  Cranial nerves;  Cranial neuropathy;  CT;  MRI;  Skull base


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

34) 

Yang, G.J., Murray, J.D., Glasser, M., Pearlson, G.D., Krystal, J.H., Schleifer, C., Repovs, G., Anticevic, A.
Altered Global Signal Topography in Schizophrenia
(2017) Cerebral Cortex, 27 (11), pp. 5156-5169. 

DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhw297


a Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT, United States
b Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT, United States
c Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT, United States
d Department of Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
e Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital, 200 Retreat Avenue, Hartford, CT, United States
f NIAAA Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism, New Haven, CT, United States
g Department of Psychology, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
h Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT, United States


Abstract
Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a disabling neuropsychiatric disease associated with disruptions across distributed neural systems. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has identified extensive abnormalities in the blood-oxygen level-dependent signal in SCZ patients, including alterations in the average signal over the brain - i.e. The "global" signal (GS). It remains unknown, however, if these "global" alterations occur pervasively or follow a spatially preferential pattern. This study presents the first network-by-network quantification of GS topography in healthy subjects and SCZ patients. We observed a nonuniform GS contribution in healthy comparison subjects, whereby sensory areas exhibited the largest GS component. In SCZ patients, we identified preferential GS representation increases across association regions, while sensory regions showed preferential reductions. GS representation in sensory versus association cortices was strongly anti-correlated in healthy subjects. This anti-correlated relationship was markedly reduced in SCZ. Such shifts in GS topography may underlie profound alterations in neural information flow in SCZ, informing development of pharmacotherapies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Author Keywords
association cortex;  default mode network;  frontoparietal control network;  resting state;  sensory cortex


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

35) 

Omar, M.H., Campbell, M.K., Xiao, X., Zhong, Q., Brunken, W.J., Miner, J.H., Greer, C.A., Koleske, A.J.
CNS Neurons Deposit Laminin α5 to Stabilize Synapses
(2017) Cell Reports, 21 (5), pp. 1281-1292. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.10.028


a Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
b Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
c Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
d Department of Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
e Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States
f Department of Ophthalmology, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, United States
g Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. LouisMO, United States


Abstract
Synapses in the developing brain are structurally dynamic but become stable by early adulthood. We demonstrate here that an α5-subunit-containing laminin stabilizes synapses during this developmental transition. Hippocampal neurons deposit laminin α5 at synapses during adolescence as connections stabilize. Disruption of laminin α5 in neurons causes dramatic fluctuations in dendritic spine head size that can be rescued by exogenous α5-containing laminin. Conditional deletion of laminin α5 in vivo increases dendritic spine size and leads to an age-dependent loss of synapses accompanied by behavioral defects. Remaining synapses have larger postsynaptic densities and enhanced neurotransmission. Finally, we provide evidence that laminin α5 acts through an integrin α3β1-Abl2 kinase-p190RhoGAP signaling cascade and partners with laminin β2 to regulate dendritic spine density and behavior. Together, our results identify laminin α5 as a stabilizer of dendritic spines and synapses in the brain and elucidate key cellular and molecular mechanisms by which it acts. In the developing brain, synaptic structure transitions from dynamic to stable by early adulthood. Omar et al. identify a laminin molecule deposited at synapses in the brain that is essential for dendritic spine structural regulation and synapse stability between early postnatal development and adulthood. © 2017 The Author(s)


Author Keywords
adhesion;  ECM;  extracellular matrix;  Lama5;  Lamb2;  motility;  stability;  structural plasticity;  synapse loss;  synapse maturation


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

36) 

Hughes, M.E., Abruzzi, K.C., Allada, R., Anafi, R., Arpat, A.B., Asher, G., Baldi, P., de Bekker, C., Bell-Pedersen, D., Blau, J., Brown, S., Ceriani, M.F., Chen, Z., Chiu, J.C., Cox, J., Crowell, A.M., DeBruyne, J.P., Dijk, D.-J., DiTacchio, L., Doyle, F.J., Duffield, G.E., Dunlap, J.C., Eckel-Mahan, K., Esser, K.A., FitzGerald, G.A., Forger, D.B., Francey, L.J., Fu, Y.-H., Gachon, F., Gatfield, D., de Goede, P., Golden, S.S., Green, C., Harer, J., Harmer, S., Haspel, J., Hastings, M.H., Herzel, H., Herzog, E.D., Hoffmann, C., Hong, C., Hughey, J.J., Hurley, J.M., de la Iglesia, H.O., Johnson, C., Kay, S.A., Koike, N., Kornacker, K., Kramer, A., Lamia, K., Leise, T., Lewis, S.A., Li, J., Li, X., Liu, A.C., Loros, J.J., Martino, T.A., Menet, J.S., Merrow, M., Millar, A.J., Mockler, T., Naef, F., Nagoshi, E., Nitabach, M.N., Olmedo, M., Nusinow, D.A., Ptácek, L.J., Rand, D., Reddy, A.B., Robles, M.S., Roenneberg, T., Rosbash, M., Ruben, M.D., Rund, S.S.C., Sancar, A., Sassone-Corsi, P., Sehgal, A., Sherrill-Mix, S., Skene, D.J., Storch, K.-F., Takahashi, J.S., Ueda, H.R., Wang, H., Weitz, C., Westermark, P.O., Wijnen, H., Xu, Y., Wu, G., Yoo, S.-H., Young, M., Zhang, E.E., Zielinski, T., Hogenesch, J.B.
Guidelines for Genome-Scale Analysis of Biological Rhythms
(2017) Journal of Biological Rhythms, 32 (5), pp. 380-393. 

DOI: 10.1177/0748730417728663


a Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, United States
c Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, United States
d Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, United States
e Center for Integrative Genomics, Génopode University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
f Vital-IT, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland
g Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
h Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics, University of California, Irvine, United States
i Department of Biology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, United States
j Department of Biology, Texas A&M University, College Station, United States
k Department of Biology, New York University, New York, United States
l Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zürich, Switzerland
m Laboratorio de Genética del Comportamiento, Fundación Instituto Leloir, IIBBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina
n Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, United States
o Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, United States
p Computational Systems Biochemistry, Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
q Department of Molecular and Systems Biology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, United States
r Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
s Surrey Sleep Research Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom
t The University of Kansas Medical Center, University of Kansas, Kansas City, United States
u John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Boston, MA, United States
v Department of Biological Sciences, Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, United States
w Institute of Molecular Medicine, McGovern Medical School, UT Health Houston, Houston, TX, United States
x Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, United States
y Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, United States
z Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
aa Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States
ab Kavli Institute for Fundamental Neuroscience, Weill Institute of Neuroscience, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, United States
ac Department of Diabetes and Circadian Rhythms, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland
ad Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
ae Center for Circadian Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States
af Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
ag Department of Mathematics, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States
ah Department of Plant Biology, University of California, Davis, United States
ai Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, United Kingdom
aj Institute for Theoretical Biology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany
ak Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States
al Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States
am Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, United States
an Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, United States
ao Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States
ap Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States
aq Department of Physiology and Systems Bioscience, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan
ar Division of Sensory Biophysics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, United States
as Laboratory of Chronobiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany
at Department of Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States
au Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, United States
av Department of Biology, University of Missouri–St. Louis, United States
aw Department of Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, China
ax Department of Biological Sciences, University of MemphisTN, United States
ay Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, United States
az Centre for Cardiovascular Investigations, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
ba Institute of Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Germany
bb SynthSys and School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
bc Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, United States
bd The Institute of Bioengineering, School of Life Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
be Department of Genetics and Evolution, University of Geneva, Switzerland
bf Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Department of Genetics, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States
bg Department of Genetics, University of Seville, Spain
bh Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, United States
bi Warwick Systems Biology and Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Conventry, United Kingdom
bj The Francis Crick Institute, London, United Kingdom
bk UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
bl Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
bm Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States
bn Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, University of California, Irvine, United States
bo Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, United States
bp Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, United States
bq Chronobiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom
br Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
bs Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
bt Department of Systems Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
bu Japan Laboratory for Synthetic Biology, RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, Osaka, Japan
bv Center for Circadian Clocks, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China
bw Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
bx Institute of Genetics and Biometry, Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Dummerstorf, Germany
by Biological Sciences and Institute for Life Sciences, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
bz Cam-Su GRC, Soochow University, Suzhou, China
ca Laboratory of Genetics, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, United States
cb National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing, China


Abstract
Genome biology approaches have made enormous contributions to our understanding of biological rhythms, particularly in identifying outputs of the clock, including RNAs, proteins, and metabolites, whose abundance oscillates throughout the day. These methods hold significant promise for future discovery, particularly when combined with computational modeling. However, genome-scale experiments are costly and laborious, yielding “big data” that are conceptually and statistically difficult to analyze. There is no obvious consensus regarding design or analysis. Here we discuss the relevant technical considerations to generate reproducible, statistically sound, and broadly useful genome-scale data. Rather than suggest a set of rigid rules, we aim to codify principles by which investigators, reviewers, and readers of the primary literature can evaluate the suitability of different experimental designs for measuring different aspects of biological rhythms. We introduce CircaInSilico, a web-based application for generating synthetic genome biology data to benchmark statistical methods for studying biological rhythms. Finally, we discuss several unmet analytical needs, including applications to clinical medicine, and suggest productive avenues to address them. © 2017, © 2017 The Author(s).


Author Keywords
biostatistics;  ChIP-seq;  circadian rhythms;  computational biology;  diurnal rhythms;  functional genomics;  guidelines;  metabolomics;  proteomics;  RNA-seq;  systems biology


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

37) 

Barch, D.M., Albaugh, M.D., Avenevoli, S., Chang, L., Clark, D.B., Glantz, M.D., Hudziak, J.J., Jernigan, T.L., Tapert, S.F., Yurgelun-Todd, D., Alia-Klein, N., Potter, A.S., Paulus, M.P., Prouty, D., Zucker, R.A., Sher, K.J.
Demographic, physical and mental health assessments in the adolescent brain and cognitive development study: Rationale and description
(2017) Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2017.10.010


a Departments of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Psychiatry, Washington University, Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States
b Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Mail Stop 446 AR6, 1 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, United States
c National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, 6001 Executive Blvd, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States
d Chang Department of Radiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 419 W. Redwood Street, Suite 225, Baltimore, MD 21201, United States
e Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15215, United States
f Department of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States
g Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Joe's Room 3213, Box 364SJ, 1 South Prospect, Burlington, VT 05401, United States
h Departments of Cognitive Science, Psychiatry and Radiology, University of California at San Diego,9500 Gilman Drive(0603), La Jolla, CA 92093-0603, United States
i Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego,9500 Gilman Drive(0603), La Jolla, CA 92093-0603, United States
j Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah School of Medicine, 501 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, United States
k Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Friedman Brain Institute, 1470 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10029, United States
l Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street Arnold 6, Burlington, VT 05401, United States
m Laureate Institute for Brain Research, 6655 South Yale Ave, Tulsa, OK 74136-3326, United States
n Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025, United States
o Department of Psychiatry and Addiction Center, University of Michigan, Rachel UpJohn Building, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, United States
p Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, 200 South Seventh Street, Columbia, MO 65211, United States


Abstract
The Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study incorporates a comprehensive range of measures assessing predictors and outcomes related to both mental and physical health across childhood and adolescence. The workgroup developed a battery that would assess a comprehensive range of domains that address study aims while minimizing participant and family burden. We review the major considerations that went into deciding what constructs to cover in the demographics, physical health and mental health domains, as well as the process of selecting measures, piloting and refining the originally proposed battery. We present a description of the baseline battery, as well as the six-month interim assessments and the one-year follow-up assessments. This battery includes assessments from the perspectives of both the parent and the target youth, as well as teacher reports. This battery will provide a foundational baseline assessment of the youth's current function so as to permit characterization of stability and change in key domains over time. The findings from this battery will also be utilized to identify both resilience markers that predict healthy development and risk factors for later adverse outcomes in physical health, mental health, and substance use and abuse. © 2017 The Authors.


Author Keywords
Assessment;  Mental health;  Physical health;  Psychopathology


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

38) 

Kelly, D.L., Buchbinder, D., Duarte, R.F., Auletta, J.J., Bhatt, N., Byrne, M., DeFilipp, Z., Gabriel, M., Mahindra, A., Norkin, M., Schoemans, H., Shah, A.J., Ahmed, I., Atsuta, Y., Basak, G.W., Beattie, S., Bhella, S., Bredeson, C., Bunin, N., Dalal, J., Daly, A., Gajewski, J., Gale, R.P., Galvin, J., Hamadani, M., Hayashi, R.J., Adekola, K., Law, J., Lee, C.J., Liesveld, J., Malone, A.K., Nagler, A., Naik, S., Nishihori, T., Parsons, S.K., Scherwath, A., Schofield, H.-L., Soiffer, R., Szer, J., Twist, I., Warwick, A., Wirk, B.M., Yi, J., Battiwalla, M., Flowers, M.E., Savani, B., Shaw, B.E.
Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Expert Review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and Complications and Quality of Life Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
(2017) Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.09.004


a Shands HealthCare and University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
b Divsison of Pediatrics Hematology, Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, California
c University Hospital Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain
d Blood and Marrow Transplant Program and Host Defense Program, Division of Hematology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
e Blood and Marrow Transplant Program and Host Defense Program, Division of Oncology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
f Blood and Marrow Transplant Program and Host Defense Program, Division of Bone Marrow Transplant and Infectious Diseases, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
g Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
h Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
i Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
j The Children's Hospital at Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
k Scripps Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, La Jolla, California
l University Hospital of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
m Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, Lucille Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California
n Division of Pediatric Hem/Onc/BMT, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
o UMKC School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri
p Japanese Data Center for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Nagoya, Japan
q Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
r Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
s Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Rehabilitation, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
t Ottawa Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
u Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
v Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
w Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio
x Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
y Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hematology Research Centre, London, United Kingdom
z Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
aa Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
ab Tufts University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
ac Utah Blood and Marrow Transplant Program Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
ad Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
ae Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
af Hematology Division and BMT, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
ag Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
ah Texas Transplant Institute, San Antonino, Texas
ai Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida
aj Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
ak Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
al Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
am Department Clinical Haematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, Australia
an Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland
ao Division of Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington
ap Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
aq Hematopoietic Transplantation Section, Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland


Abstract
Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a potentially curative treatment for children and adults with malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Despite increasing survival rates, long-term morbidity after HCT is substantial. Neurocognitive dysfunction is a serious cause of morbidity, yet little is known about neurocognitive dysfunction after HCT. To address this gap, collaborative efforts of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation undertook an expert review of neurocognitive dysfunction after HCT. In this review we define what constitutes neurocognitive dysfunction, characterize its risk factors and sequelae, describe tools and methods to assess neurocognitive function in HCT recipients, and discuss possible interventions for HCT patients with this condition. This review aims to help clinicians understand the scope of this health-related problem, highlight its impact on well-being of survivors, and help determine factors that may improve identification of patients at risk for declines in cognitive functioning after HCT. In particular, we review strategies for preventing and treating neurocognitive dysfunction in HCT patients. Finally, we highlight the need for well-designed studies to develop and test interventions aimed at preventing and improving neurocognitive dysfunction and its sequelae after HCT. © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.


Author Keywords
Bone marrow transplantation;  Cognition;  Cognitive function;  Hematology oncology;  Hematopoietic cell transplantation;  Neurocognitive dysfunction


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

39) 

Martin, T., Smith, A., Breatnach, C.R., Kent, E., Shanahan, I., Boyle, M., Levy, P.T., Franklin, O., El-Khuffash, A.
Infants Born with Down Syndrome: Burden of Disease in the Early Neonatal Period
(2017) Journal of Pediatrics, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.046


a Department of Neonatology, The Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
b Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
c Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO
d Goryeb Children's Hospital, Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ
e Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
f School of Medicine (Department of Pediatrics), Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland


Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the incidence of direct admission of infants with Down syndrome to the postnatal ward (well newborn nursery) vs the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to describe the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Study design: This retrospective cohort study of Down syndrome used the maternal/infant database (2011-2016) at the Rotunda Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Admission location, early neonatal morbidities, outcomes, and duration of stay were evaluated and regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors associated with morbidity and mortality. Results: Of the 121 infants with Down syndrome, 54 (45%) were initially admitted to the postnatal ward, but 38 (70%) were later admitted to the NICU. Low oxygen saturation profile was the most common cause for the initial and subsequent admission to the NICU. Sixty-six percent of the infants (80/121) had CHD, 34% (41/121) had PH, and 6% died. Risk factors independently associated with primary NICU admission included antenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome, presence of CHD, PH, and the need for ventilation. Conclusions: Infants with Down syndrome initially admitted to the postnatal ward have a high likelihood of requiring NICU admission. Overall, high rates of neonatal morbidity were noted, including rates of PH that were higher than previously reported. Proper screening of all infants with Down syndrome for CHD and PH is recommended to facilitate timely diagnoses and potentially shorten the duration of the hospital stay. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Author Keywords
Admission;  Down syndrome;  Morbidity;  Mortality;  Neonatal intensive care unit;  Pulmonary hypertension


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

40) 

Poldrack, R.A., Monahan, J., Imrey, P.B., Reyna, V., Raichle, M.E., Faigman, D., Buckholtz, J.W.
Predicting Violent Behavior: What Can Neuroscience Add?
(2017) Trends in Cognitive Sciences, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.11.003


a Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
b School of Law, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
c Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA
d Human Neuroscience Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
e Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
f University of California Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco, CA, USA
g Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA


Abstract
The ability to accurately predict violence and other forms of serious antisocial behavior would provide important societal benefits, and there is substantial enthusiasm for the potential predictive accuracy of neuroimaging techniques. Here, we review the current status of violence prediction using actuarial and clinical methods, and assess the current state of neuroprediction. We then outline several questions that need to be addressed by future studies of neuroprediction if neuroimaging and other neuroscientific markers are to be successfully translated into public policy. Violent behavior is a costly large-scale societal problem.There is growing interest in using neuroscience data to assess risk for future violent behavior, but the utility of neuroscience for violence risk assessment remains to be established.We review what is currently known about the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of violence, and evaluate recent neuroprediction efforts.Finally, we outline a set of practices for enhancing the validity and reliability of future risk assessment based on neuroscientific measures. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Author Keywords
Crime;  Machine learning;  Neuroimaging;  Predictive modeling;  Violence


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

41) 

Mauro, A., Savarino, E., De Bortoli, N., Tolone, S., Pugliese, D., Franchina, M., Gyawali, C.P., Penagini, R.
Optimal number of multiple rapid swallows needed during high-resolution esophageal manometry for accurate prediction of contraction reserve
(2017) Neurogastroenterology and Motility, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1111/nmo.13253


a Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano - Italy Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico Milan Italy
b Division of Gastroenterology Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology University of Padua Padua Italy
c Division of Gastroenterology Department of Translational Research and New Technology in Medicine and Surgery University of Pisa Cisanello Hospital Pisa Italy
d Division of General and Bariatric Surgery Department of Surgery Second University of Naples Naples Italy
e Division of Gastroenterology Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis Missouri


Abstract
Background: Multiple rapid swallows (MRS) is a provocative test for assessment of contraction reserve, however reproducibility on repetitive MRS is incompletely understood. Our aim was to determine the optimal number of MRS sequences for consistent assessment of contraction reserve. Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine consecutive patients (79 IEM and 80 normal motility) who underwent high-resolution manometers were enrolled. Ten single swallows (SS) and 10 MRS were performed. Gold standard for evaluation of the contraction reserve was the ratio between the mean DCI of 10 MRS and the mean DCI of 10 SS (MRS/SS DCI ratio). Rates of false negatives and false positives were calculated for increasing numbers of MRS sequences, using either mean DCI or the MRS with the highest DCI. Key Results: According to the gold standard, 50 IEM and 50 normal motility patients had contraction reserve. With progressively increasing numbers of MRS sequences, contraction reserve was detected using mean MRS DCI within three and four MRS sequences in IEM and normal motility respectively, whereas two and three MRS sequences were needed using the MRS sequence with the highest DCI. False positives were much higher with highest DCI method compared with mean DCI, (22% vs 9% respectively in IEM; 24% vs 9% in normal motility) when three MRS sequences were considered. Conclusions & Inferences: At least three MRS are needed to reliably assess contraction reserve. The mean DCI of the three MRS sequences is the best variable to utilize as evidence of contraction reserve. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Author Keywords
Contraction reserve;  High resolution manometry;  Ineffective esophageal motility;  Multiple rapid swallows


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

42) 

Waldron, M., Watkins, N.K., Bucholz, K.K., Madden, P.A.F., Heath, A.C.
Interactive Effects of Maternal Alcohol Problems and Parental Separation on Timing of Daughter's First Drink
(2017) Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1111/acer.13537


a Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana
b Midwest Alcoholism Research Center and Family Research Center Department of Psychiatry Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Missouri


Abstract
Background: Few studies examine risk to offspring who experience both parental alcohol problems and parental separation and still fewer consider gender of the affected parent. We examined interactive effects of maternal versus paternal alcohol problems and parental separation on timing of first alcoholic drink in daughters. Methods: Data were drawn from a sample of 3,539 European (or other) ancestry (EA) and 611 African ancestry (AA) female twins born between 1975 and 1985, median age 15 at first assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were estimated predicting age at first full drink from parental history of alcohol problems (mother only, father only, or both parents), parental separation during childhood, and the interaction of parental alcohol problems and parental separation. Cox models were estimated without and with adjustment for correlated risk factors, separately for EA and AA twins. Results: For both EA and AA twins, a significant interaction between parental separation and mother-only alcohol problems was observed, suggesting reduced risk of drinking associated with mother-only alcohol problems in separated versus intact families. Conclusions: Findings highlight parental separation as an important moderator of risk to children of mothers who have a history of problem drinking, with interactive effects observed consistently across racial group. To identify underlying processes, additional research is needed with more detailed characterization of separated families where mother only has a history of alcohol problems. © 2017 Research Society on Alcoholism.


Author Keywords
Onset of Alcohol Use;  Parental Alcohol Problems;  Parental Separation or Divorce


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

43) 

Tayebi, N., Parisiadou, L., Berhe, B., Gonzalez, A.N., Serra-Vinardell, J., Tamargo, R.J., Maniwang, E., Sorrentino, Z., Fujiwara, H., Grey, R.J., Hassan, S., Blech-Hermoni, Y.N., Chen, C., McGlinchey, R., Makariou-Pikis, C., Brooks, M., Ginns, E.I., Ory, D.S., Giasson, B.I., Sidransky, E.
Glucocerebrosidase haploinsufficiency in A53T α-synuclein mice impacts disease onset and course
(2017) Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2017.11.001


a Medical Genetics Branch, NHGRI, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA
b Department of Pharmacology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
c Department of Neuroscience, Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Disease, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
d Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
e Laboratory of Protein Conformation and Dynamics, NHLBI, NIH, Bethesda, MD. USA
f Lysosomal Disorders Treatment and Research Program, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA


Abstract
Mutations in GBA1 encountered in Gaucher disease are a leading risk factor for Parkinson disease and associated Lewy body disorders. Many GBA1 mutation carriers, especially those with severe or null GBA1 alleles, have earlier and more progressive parkinsonism. To model the effect of partial glucocerebrosidase deficiency on neurological progression in vivo, mice with a human A53T α-synuclein (SNCA A53T) transgene were crossed with heterozygous null gba mice (gba +/-). Survival analysis of 84 mice showed that in gba +/-//SNCA A53T hemizygotes and homozygotes, the symptom onset was significantly earlier than in gba +/+ //SNCA A53T mice (p-values 0.023-0.0030), with exacerbated disease progression (p-value <0.0001). Over-expression of SNCA A53T had no effect on glucocerebrosidase levels or activity. Immunoblotting demonstrated that gba haploinsufficiency did not lead to increased levels of either monomeric SNCA or insoluble high molecular weight SNCA in this model. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the abundance and distribution of SNCA pathology was also unaltered by gba haploinsufficiency. Thus, while the underlying mechanism is not clear, this model shows that gba deficiency impacts the age of onset and disease duration in aged SNCA A53T mice, providing a valuable resource to identify modifiers, pathways and possible moonlighting roles of glucocerebrosidase in Parkinson pathogenesis. © 2017.


Author Keywords
A-synuclein;  Aggregates;  Gaucher disease;  Glucocerebrosidase;  Mouse model;  Parkinson disease


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

44) 

Roostaei, T., Felsky, D., Nazeri, A., De Jager, P.L., Schneider, J.A., Bennett, D.A., Voineskos, A.N.
Genetic influence of plasma homocysteine on Alzheimer's disease
(2017) Neurobiology of Aging, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.09.033


a Kimel Family Translational Imaging-Genetics Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
b Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
c Cell Circuits Program, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA
d Center for Translational and Computational Neuroimmunology, Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA
e Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
f Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
g Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
h Department of Pathology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
i Underserved Populations Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Abstract
Observational studies have consistently reported elevated plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, results from clinical trials of homocysteine-lowering treatments are inconsistent. This discrepancy may be explained by a lack of causal association between homocysteine and AD. Mendelian randomization studies have the potential to provide insight into the causality of this association through studying the effect of genetic predisposition to high homocysteine on AD. Our analyses using summarized (n = 54,162) and individual participant (n = 6987) data from Caucasian participants did not show an effect of plasma homocysteine genetic risk on susceptibility to AD. Although with smaller sample sizes, further subanalyses also did not support an effect of genetically determined plasma homocysteine on cognitive impairment and decline, beta-amyloid and tau pathology and gray matter atrophy in AD. However, we found associations with tau tangle burden (n = 251) and gray matter atrophy (n = 605) in cognitively normal elderly. Our results do not support a causal association between elevated homocysteine and risk, severity, and progression of AD. However, the relationship between genetically determined homocysteine and brain pathology in cognitively normal elderly requires further exploration. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Author Keywords
Aging;  Alzheimer's disease;  Causal association;  Mendelian randomization;  Plasma homocysteine;  Polygenic score


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

45) 

Aung, W.Y., Massoumzadeh, P., Najmi, S., Salter, A., Heaps, J., Benzinger, T.L.S., Mar, S.
Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Biomarker to Differentiate Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis From Multiple Sclerosis at First Demyelination
(2017) Pediatric Neurology, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2017.09.016


a M.D. Degree Program, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
b Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
c Department of Neurology, Tabriz University of Medical Science, Tabriz, Iran
d Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
e Missouri Institute of Mental Health, University of Missouri-Saint Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
f Department of Pediatric and Developmental Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri


Abstract
Background: There are no clinical features or biomarkers that can reliably differentiate acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the first demyelination attack. Consequently, a final diagnosis is sometimes delayed by months and years of follow-up. Early treatment for multiple sclerosis is recommended to reduce long-term disability. Therefore, we intend to explore neuroimaging biomarkers that can reliably distinguish between the two diagnoses. Methods: We reviewed prospectively collected clinical, standard MRI and diffusion tensor imaging data of 12 pediatric patients who presented with acute demyelination with and without encephalopathy. Patients were followed for an average of 6.5 years to determine the accuracy of final diagnosis. Final diagnosis was determined using 2013 International Pediatric MS Study Group criteria. Control subjects consisted of four age-matched healthy individuals for each patient. Results: The study population consisted of six patients with central nervous system demyelination with encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and six without encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome at high risk for multiple sclerosis. During follow-up, two patients with initial diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis were later diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging region of interest analysis of baseline scans showed differences between final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients, whereby low fractional anisotropy and high radial diffusivity occurred in multiple sclerosis patients compared with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients and the age-matched controls. Conclusions: Fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity measures may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for distinguishing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the onset. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Author Keywords
Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis;  DTI;  Multiple sclerosis;  Neuroimaging biomarker


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

 

46) 

Grajales-Reyes, J.G., García-González, A., María-Ríos, J.C., Grajales-Reyes, G.E., Delgado-Vélez, M., Báez-Pagán, C.A., Quesada, O., Gómez, C.M., Lasalde-Dominicci, J.A.
A Panel of Slow-Channel Syndrome Mice Reveals a Unique Locomotor Behavioral Signature
(2017) Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases, 4 (4), pp. 341-347. 

DOI: 10.3233/JND-170226


a Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, PO Box 23360, San Juan, PR, United States
b Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR, United States
c Department of Physical Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR, United States
d Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
e Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Medical ScientistTraining Program (MSTP), MSTP-Box 8226, 660 Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO, United States
f University of Massachusetts Medical School, Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), 55 Lake Ave North, Worcester, MA, United States
g University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, B. 365067, San Juan, PR, Puerto Rico
h Molecular Sciences Research Center, University of Puerto Rico, 1390 Ponce de León Avenue, San Juan, PR, Puerto Rico
i University of Puerto Rico, Physical Sciences Department, P.O. BOX 23323, San Juan, PR, Puerto Rico


Abstract
Muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutations can lead to altered channel kinetics and neuromuscular junction degeneration, a neurodegenerative disorder collectively known as slow-channel syndrome (SCS). A multivariate analysis using running wheels was used to generate activity profiles for a variety of SCS models, uncovering unique locomotor patterns for the different nAChR mutants. Particularly, the αL251T and ?L269F mutations exhibit decreased event distance, duration, and velocity over a period of 24 hours. Our approach suggests a robust relationship between the pathophysiology of SCS and locomotor activity. © 2017 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.


Author Keywords
acetylcholine;  Congenital myasthenia;  locomotor activity;  mice;  motor endplate;  myalgia;  neuromuscular junction (NMJ);  nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR);  running


Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

 

47) 

Scott-Wittenborn, N., Jackson, R.S.
Intraoperative imaging during minimally invasive transoral robotic surgery using near-infrared light
(2017) American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, . Article in Press. 

DOI: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2017.09.001


Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States


Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of the FIREFLY imaging system could be an asset in transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). The system uses indocyanine green dye (ICG), which fluoresces when illuminated by near-infrared light from the Da Vinci robot. The system may improve visualization of tumor margins, highlight important vascular structures, and help identify the location of tumors and unknown primary head and neck cancers. Methods: Six patients with OPSCC were enrolled in the study. Two of these cases were unknown primaries, one was base of tongue, and three were palatine tonsils. Each patient was given two 3. ml doses of ICG, one at the beginning of the surgical case and one during resection of the tumor. The oropharynx was then visualized using the near-infrared light of the Da Vinci robot for a minute after injection. Results: The FIREFLY system was unable to detect gross tumors, positive margins, unknown primaries, or vascular structures in any of the six subjects in the study. In addition, there were no adverse events or side effects in any of the subjects. Conclusion: The use of the FIREFLY system with indocyanine green fluorescence did not identify tumor boundaries, unknown primary head and neck cancers, or vascular structures in the oropharynx. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Author Keywords
Da Vinci;  FIREFLY;  Indocyanine green;  Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma;  Transoral robotic surgery


Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus