Cox named Wise Endowed Chair in Pediatric Anesthesiology

Noted for his talents as educator, collaborator, clinician From the WashU School of Medicine News… Thomas E. Cox, MD, an innovative educator and noted mentor and anesthesiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been named the inaugural Rudolph L. and Mary Frances Wise Endowed Chair in Pediatric Anesthesiology. Cox, a professor […]

Grad students Hailun Li and Weikang Shi win 2018 Thach Awards

Many thanks to all who participated in this year’s Neuroscience Retreat.  Graduate student and post doc presenters at the Retreat were eligible for the Thach Award competition.  The 2018 winners: Short Talks: Hailun Li (Neuroscience Program; DiAntonio lab) “A neuromodulatory circuit regulating the glial capacity to buffer K+” Posters: Weikang Shi (Neuroscience program; Padoa-Schioppa lab) “Establishing […]

New child maltreatment research center launched with $6.5 million NIH grant

Multidisciplinary center includes Constantino’s research on newborns From the WashU Newsroom… Melissa Jonson-Reid, the Ralph and Muriel Pumphrey Professor of Social Work Research at the Brown School, and her team, including faculty from several disciplines across Washington University in St. Louis and Saint Louis University, have received a five-year, $6,496,050 grant from the National Institutes of Health […]

Bonni, Diamond elected to National Academy of Medicine

Membership is one of highest U.S. honors in health and medicine From the WashU School of Medicine News… Neuroscientist Azad Bonni, MD, PhD, and virologist and immunologist Michael S. Diamond, MD, PhD, both of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, a part of the National Academy […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Associations between depression, anxious arousal and manifestations of psychological inflexibility” (2019) Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry Associations between depression, anxious arousal and manifestations of psychological inflexibility (2019) Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 62, pp. 88-96.  Gilbert, K.E.a , Tonge, N.A.b , Thompson, R.J.b a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington University in St. […]

Implantable, biodegradable devices speed nerve regeneration in rats

Pulses of electrical stimulation help heal injured nerves From the WashU Newsroom… Car accidents, sports injuries, even too much typing and texting can injure the peripheral nerves, leaving people with numbness, tingling and weakness in their hands, arms or legs. Recovery can take months, and doctors have little to offer to speed it along. Now, […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Examining the Role of Cone-expressed RPE65 in Mouse Cone Function” (2018) Scientific Reports Examining the Role of Cone-expressed RPE65 in Mouse Cone Function (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 14201, .  Kolesnikov, A.V.a , Tang, P.H.b c , Kefalov, V.J.a a Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States b Department of Ophthalmology, […]

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems

Mouse study provides clues to sudden onset of digestive woes From the WashU Newsroom… While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people possibly develop […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching” (2019) NeuroImage Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching (2019) NeuroImage, 184, pp. 335-348.  Demirtaş, M.a b , Ponce-Alvarez, A.b , Gilson, M.b , Hagmann, P.d , Mantini, D.e f , Betti, V.g h , Romani, G.L.i , Friston, K.j , Corbetta, M.k l , Deco, G.b c m n […]

Mysteries explored: Pioneering neurologist Marcus Raichle, MD, opened up the human brain to scientific investigation

From the WashU School of Medicine’s Outlook Magazine… In a 1987 expedition, neurologist Marcus Raichle, MD, climbed 18,000 feet above sea level, scaling the icy Karakoram Mountains of Pakistan. There, amidst heavy snow and high winds, Raichle and 18 researchers injected themselves with radioactive xenon. A crude scanner measured the gas as it diffused through […]

Roundtable on opioids brings HHS leaders to Medical Campus

Officials tour research lab focused on fighting opioid addiction From the WashU School of Medicine News… Leaders from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) visited the Washington University Medical Campus on Sept. 20 to learn about strategies to address the opioid crisis, which has claimed the lives of more than 200,000 people […]

Overlooked signal in MRI scans reflects amount, kind of brain cells

Data may aid diagnosis of brain conditions, shed light on brain development From the WashU School of Medicine News… An MRI scan often generates an ocean of data, most of which is never used. When overlooked data is analyzed using a new technique developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, they surprisingly […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from Brazilian prephonological spellers” (2019) Cognition Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from Brazilian prephonological spellers (2019) Cognition, 182, pp. 1-7.  Treiman, R.a , Cardoso-Martins, C.b , Pollo, T.C.c , Kessler, B.a a Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, United States b Departamento de Psicologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil c Departamento […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Widely Metastatic Choroid Plexus Carcinoma Associated with Novel TP53 Somatic Mutation” (2018) World Neurosurgery Widely Metastatic Choroid Plexus Carcinoma Associated with Novel TP53 Somatic Mutation (2018) World Neurosurgery, 119, pp. 233-236.  Baksh, B.S.a , Sinha, N.b , Salehi, A.a , Han, R.H.a , Miller, B.A.a d , Dahiya, S.b , Gauvain, K.M.c , Limbrick, D.D., Jr.a a Department of Neurological […]

‘The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein’

Event to explore bioethics and medical practice Sept. 28-30 From the WashU Newsroom… Patient care. Informed consent. Genetics and transplantation. Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” is a thrilling adventure but also a prescient guidebook to the moral and ethical dilemmas of 20th and 21st century medicine. This month, Washington University in St. Louis’ School of Medicine and […]

Gordon receives Luminary Award

Precision medicine group honors father of the microbiome From the WashU Newsroom… Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a 2018 Luminary Award from the Precision Medicine World Conference. He is being honored for his pioneering work in founding the field of gut microbiome research and for fundamentally altering […]

Cordell Institute to take on issues of ethics, policy in data-driven health care and beyond

Institute will work at intersection of science, medicine, ethics and law From the WashU Newsroom… Precision medicine is an approach that allows doctors to more accurately treat and prevent disease by taking into consideration a patient’s data, such as his or her genetics, diet, environment and lifestyle. This approach provides a more individualized path of […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Altered functional network connectivity relates to motor development in children born very preterm” (2018) NeuroImage Altered functional network connectivity relates to motor development in children born very preterm (2018) NeuroImage, 183, pp. 574-583.  Wheelock, M.D.a , Austin, N.C.b , Bora, S.c , Eggebrecht, A.T.d , Melzer, T.R.e , Woodward, L.J.f , Smyser, C.D.d g h a Department of Psychiatry, Washington […]

Study seeks former opioid users who avoided addiction

Researchers want to understand how genetics affects opioid addiction From the WashU School of Medicine News… Individuals with a history of opioid misuse — but no history of opioid addiction — may help scientists identify genes that protect against opioid-use disorders. To that end, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are […]

Gurnett named director of pediatric and developmental neurology

Physician-scientist specializes in epilepsy, neurodevelopmental disorders From the WashU School of Medicine News… Christina Gurnett, MD, PhD, a professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been named director of the Division of Pediatric and Developmental Neurology at the School of Medicine and neurologist-in-chief at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. “Dr. […]

Focused delivery for brain cancers

Interdisciplinary research brings together imaging, aerosols and pediatric neuro oncology to fight tumors From the WashU Newsroom… A person’s brainstem controls some of the body’s most important functions, including heart beat, respiration, blood pressure and swallowing. Tumor growth in this part of the brain is therefore twice as devastating. Not only can such a growth […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Training models for implementing evidence-based psychological treatment for college mental health: A cluster randomized trial study protocol” (2018) Contemporary Clinical Trials Training models for implementing evidence-based psychological treatment for college mental health: A cluster randomized trial study protocol (2018) Contemporary Clinical Trials, 72, pp. 117-125.  Wilfley, D.E.a , Fitzsimmons-Craft, E.E.a , Eichen, D.M.b , Van Buren, D.J.a , Welch, […]

Experimental drug shows promise as multiple sclerosis treatment

Brain’s shrinking slows with drug From the WashU School of Medicine News… People with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis (MS) face a gradual decline of brain function that slowly strips away the ability to walk and may cause problems with speech and vision. Available treatments are only modestly effective at slowing the decline. Now, […]

Brain Initiative grants Chen $2.7 million for neuroscience study

An interdisciplinary team of WashU researchers will be developing a non-invasive neuromodulation tool From the WashU School of Engineering & Applied Science News… Hong Chen, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science and radiation oncology in the School of Medicine, has received a $2.7 million grant from the National Institutes of […]

Washington People: Robyn Klein

Neuroimmunologist promotes diversity in science From the WashU School of Medicine News… In 2016, as Robyn Klein, MD, PhD, and Jessica Williams, PhD, then a postdoctoral fellow in Klein’s lab, looked over the program for an upcoming international neuroimmunology meeting they were planning to attend, one thing jumped out at them: Only 13 of the 85 […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Transcriptomic signatures of schizophrenia revealed by dopamine perturbation in an ex vivo model” (2018) Translational Psychiatry Transcriptomic signatures of schizophrenia revealed by dopamine perturbation in an ex vivo model (2018) Translational Psychiatry, 8 (1), art. no. 158, .  Duan, J.a b , Göring, H.H.H.c , Sanders, A.R.a b , Moy, W.a b , Freda, J.a , Drigalenko, E.I.d , Kos, M.c […]

Lasers help fight deadly brain tumors

Therapy increases survival in grim diagnosis From the WashU Newsroom… People diagnosed with the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma face a grim prognosis. Half die within 14 months of diagnosis. Even if initial treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy is successful, such brain tumors typically recur, leaving patients with few options. Now, a research team at […]

Alzheimer’s one day may be predicted during eye exam

Noninvasive test may screen for disease before symptoms appear From the WashU School of Medicine News… It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using an eye exam. Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors’ offices, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis […]

Depressed patients see quality of life improve with nerve stimulation

Study focuses on people not treated effectively with antidepressants From the WashU School of Medicine News… People with depression who are treated with nerve stimulation experience significant improvements in quality of life, even when their depression symptoms don’t completely subside, according to results of a national study led by researchers at Washington University School of […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Dynamic contrast enhancement and flexible odor codes” (2018) Nature Communications Dynamic contrast enhancement and flexible odor codes (2018) Nature Communications, 9 (1), art. no. 3062, .  Nizampatnam, S.a b , Saha, D.a , Chandak, R.a , Raman, B.a b a Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, United States b Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in […]

New approach to developing antidepressants

CRISPR technology helps target mood-boosting receptors in brain From the WashU School of Medicine News… An estimated 13 percent of Americans take antidepressant drugs for depression, anxiety, chronic pain or sleep problems. For the 14 million Americans who have clinical depression, roughly one third don’t find relief with antidepressants. But now, researchers at Washington University […]

Many Faces of Neurofibromatosis

Art installation at School of Medicine depicts humanity of NF patients From the WashU School of Medicine News… Large, glossy oil paintings of people enjoying the small pleasures of everyday life – reading, practicing martial arts, scooping ice cream – line the hallways in the Farrell Learning and Teaching Center at Washington University School of […]

Diagnosing Depression in Young Kids is Harder, Incredibly Important

Experts agree that preschoolers are entirely capable of suffering from clinical depression. And that this depression is not always the result of abuse or neglect. From Fatherly… Until he began doodling bloody pictures of bleeding necks, April Lisbon wasn’t worried about the mental health of her four-year-old student. As a psychologist working with young children […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Matrine inhibits itching by lowering the activity of calcium channel” (2018) Scientific Reports Matrine inhibits itching by lowering the activity of calcium channel (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 11328, .  Geng, X.a , Shi, H.a , Ye, F.a , Du, H.b , Qian, L.a , Gu, L.a , Wu, G.a , Zhu, C.a , Yang, Y.a , Wang, C.a […]

Scientists uncover new details in how sense of smell develops

Findings could help determine how dogs evolved such good noses From the WashU School of Medicine News… Dogs, known for their extraordinarily keen senses of smell, can be trained to use their sensitive sniffers to find drugs, bombs, bed bugs, missing hikers and even cancer. Among dogs and other animals that rely on smell, at […]

How bacteria can save children’s lives

A ground-breaking new project in Bangladesh could help reduce the life-long health problems that come from childhood malnourishment – by focusing on the gut. From BBC – Future… For decades, undernourished infants across the world have been treated with a course of high-calorie, high-protein rich foods. The foods may come in various forms – from […]

Brain tumors occur often in kids with common genetic syndrome

Analysis of MRI scans identifies some unexplained bright objects as tumors From the WashU Newsroom… The frequency of brain tumors has been underestimated in children with the common genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), according to a new study. This disorder is characterized by birthmarks on the skin and benign nerve tumors that develop in […]

Mallinckrodt boosts rare-disease research at Washington University

Pharmaceutical company to fund up to $10 million to pursue new therapeutics From the WashU School of Medicine News… Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has joined with Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals in a collaborative research partnership aimed at pursuing new therapies for patients with complex medical conditions, especially rare diseases that may have few […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Small near-infrared photochromic protein for photoacoustic multi-contrast imaging and detection of protein interactions in vivo” (2018) Nature Communications Small near-infrared photochromic protein for photoacoustic multi-contrast imaging and detection of protein interactions in vivo (2018) Nature Communications, 9 (1), art. no. 2734, .  Li, L.a , Shemetov, A.A.b , Baloban, M.b , Hu, P.c , Zhu, L.c d , Shcherbakova, D.M.b , […]

Cicero receives Pioneer Award

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse honors research From the WashU School of Medicine Newsroom… Theodore J. Cicero, PhD, the John P. Feighner Professor of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is the 2018 recipient of the Pioneer Award from the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (NCADA). Cicero […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

"Nicotine aversion is mediated by GABAergic interpeduncular nucleus inputs to laterodorsal tegmentum" (2018) Nature Communications Nicotine aversion is mediated by GABAergic interpeduncular nucleus inputs to laterodorsal tegmentum (2018) Nature Communications, 9 (1), art. no. 2710, .  Wolfman, S.L.a , Gill, D.F.a , Bogdanic, F.b , Long, K.c , Al-Hasani, R.d , McCall, J.G.d e f , Bruchas, M.R.e f , McGehee, […]

Washington People: Allison King

Physician-scientist focuses on young adults with sickle cell disease From the WashU School of Medicine News… To a young Allison King, Washington University School of Medicine served as one of the best playgrounds in St. Louis. As a preschooler, she hid underneath benches in the renal lab where her mother worked. In grade school, she […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia (2018) Scientific Reports Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 10168, .  Ni, G.a b , Gratten, J.c d , Wray, N.R.c d , Lee, S.H.a b d , Ripke, S.e f , […]

Med student receives fellowship to study brain damage

Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Medical Society honors Lee From the WashU School of Medicine News… Jin Vivian Lee, a second-year medical student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is one of 60 recipients of a $5,000 summer research fellowship from the Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Medical Society. The Carolyn L. […]

Perfectionism in young children may indicate OCD risk

Study involving behavior, brain scans may help ID issues early in life From the WashU School of Medicine News… Studying young children, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that kids who possess tendencies toward perfectionism and excessive self-control are twice as likely as other children to develop obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) […]

Decriminalizing pot doesn’t lead to increased use by young people

Study also shows drop in marijuana-related arrests From the WashU School of Medicine News… As a handful of states have legalized marijuana for recreational use, some others have taken less dramatic steps toward decriminalizing pot by reducing the legal penalties associated with marijuana possession. In the latter, for example, possession of small amounts of marijuana […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

"The Open Source GAITOR Suite for Rodent Gait Analysis" (2018) Scientific Reports The Open Source GAITOR Suite for Rodent Gait Analysis (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 9797, .  Jacobs, B.Y.a , Lakes, E.H.a , Reiter, A.J.b , Lake, S.P.b , Ham, T.R.c , Leipzig, N.D.c , Porvasnik, S.L.a , Schmidt, C.E.a , Wachs, R.A.a d , Allen, K.D.a a University […]

New ALS therapy in clinical trials

Drug extends survival, reverses some neuromuscular damage in animals From the WashU School of Medicine News… About 20,000 people in the United States are living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The invariably fatal disease kills the nerve cells that control walking, eating and breathing. Few people survive more than […]

Rubin recognized by Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation

Honored for research, patient care From the WashU School of Medicine News… Joshua B. Rubin, MD, PhD, a professor of pediatrics and of neuroscience at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received the Pioneer Award for Pediatric Neuro-Oncology from the Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation. The charitable organization honored Rubin on June 6 […]