WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Common binding sites for cholesterol and neurosteroids on a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel” (2019) Biochimica et Biophysica Acta – Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids Common binding sites for cholesterol and neurosteroids on a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (2019) Biochimica et Biophysica Acta – Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1864 (2), pp. 128-136.  Budelier, M.M.a , Cheng, W.W.L.a , […]

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Injured neurons temporarily revert to immature state From the WashU School of Medicine News… Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don’t grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Cut your finger, and you’ll probably be back to using it in days or weeks; slice through your spinal cord, and […]

University receives new grant to fund Amgen Scholars Program

Undergraduate research experience supports science education and innovation From the WashU Newsroom… Washington University in St. Louis has received a new grant from the Amgen Foundation to provide hands-on laboratory experiences to undergraduate students through the Amgen Scholars Program. This marks the ninth year the university is participating in the program, which aims to inspire […]

$6.3 million for center to develop new tracers for PET scans

Could improve early diagnosis, precision medicine for cancer, atherosclerosis, other diseases From the WashU Newsroom… PET scans can reveal subtle signs of diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and atherosclerosis not detectable through other imaging tools. The technology holds enormous promise for improving early diagnosis, monitoring the effectiveness of treatment, and tailoring therapy to each individual’s […]

Scholars highlight impact of early adversity on developing brain, implications for criminal justice

From NPR’s St. Louis Public Radio… The early development of the human brain begins in utero and continues into a person’s early-to-mid-20s. In that time, various environmental factors such as poverty, toxins and violence can influence that development. Among adolescent youth, who are susceptible to engaging in risky behavior, the impact of such stressors can […]

Alzheimer’s researchers receive Chan Zuckerberg Initiative funding

Research aims to show how immune system may drive neurodegenerative diseases From the WashU School of Medicine News… A team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has been funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI)to study the root causes of neurodegenerative disorders. The project at the School of Medicine will analyze […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Ambient PM2.5 and O3 and their combined effects on prevalence of presbyopia among the elderly: A cross-sectional study in six low- and middle-income countries” (2019) Science of the Total Environment Ambient PM2.5 and O3 and their combined effects on prevalence of presbyopia among the elderly: A cross-sectional study in six low- and middle-income countries (2019) Science […]

GUEST COMMENTARY: Girls must learn to see themselves as scientists

From the Times of Northwest Indiana… I recently visited an elementary school to lead a neuroscience demonstration for fifth-graders. The activities were going splendidly: my station demonstrating the brain’s plasticity (its ability to change and adapt with the environment) saw enthusiastic students who were also able to learn about proprioception (knowing where your body is […]

Repetitive behaviors tied to brain activity patterns in toddlers

From Spectrum News… Children who have repetitive behaviors, a core autism trait, show particular patterns of brain activity as early as 1 year of age, according to a new study1. Autistic people have brain activity patterns that differ from those of their typical peers. These differences emerge early in life: A study last year showed […]

Addressing racial disparity in autism outcomes, Washington University seeks to improve diagnosis and intervention for black children

From the St. Louis American… The Center for Disease Control’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network most recently reported that 1 in 59 children, or about 1.7 percent, have an autism spectrum disorder. Historically, African-American children have being identified with autism spectrum disorder at a significantly lower rate than Caucasian children, but this gap has […]

Medical students honor their teachers at ceremony

Faculty, residents given Distinguished Service Teaching Awards From the WashU School of Medicine News… Washington University School of Medicine students recently honored faculty and residents with Distinguished Service Teaching Awards for the 2017-18 academic year. The awards, which were first given in 1991, reflect the students’ appreciation for dedication, patience and skill in training aspiring […]

AAAS names 11 Washington University faculty as fellows

From the WashU Newsroom… Eleven faculty members at Washington University in St. Louis — the most in a decade-and-a-half — are among 416 new fellows selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. Samuel Achilefu; Victoria J. Fraser, MD; Robert W. Gereau; Kathleen B. Hall; Joseph […]

Alcohol dependence, psychiatric disorders share genetic links

Key alcoholism gene influences how quickly body metabolizes alcohol From the WashU School of Medicine News… In the largest study of genetic factors linked to alcohol dependence, an international team of researchers identified a gene known to affect risk and determined that many other genes also contribute to risk for alcohol dependence to a lesser […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

"Touch engages visual spatial contextual processing" (2018) Scientific Reports Touch engages visual spatial contextual processing (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 16637, .  Pérez-Bellido, A.a b , Pappal, R.D.a c , Yau, J.M.a a Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, United States b Radboud University, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Nijmegen, Netherlands […]

Berezin, Rogers and others promoted by Board of Trustees

From the WashU Newsroom… At the Washington University in St. Louis Board of Trustees meeting Oct. 5, the following faculty were appointed with tenure or promoted with tenure, effective that day. Appointment with tenure John Gorcsan III, MD, as professor of medicine at the School of Medicine; Jianjun Guan as professor of mechanical engineering and […]

MRI scans shows promise in predicting dementia

Brain changes evident in scans before memory, cognitive decline From the WashU School of Medicine News… One day, MRI brain scans may help predict whether older people will develop dementia, new research suggests. In a small study, MRI brain scans predicted with 89 percent accuracy who would go on to develop dementia within three years, […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Conformational preferences and phase behavior of intrinsically disordered low complexity sequences: insights from multiscale simulations” (2019) Current Opinion in Structural Biology Conformational preferences and phase behavior of intrinsically disordered low complexity sequences: insights from multiscale simulations (2019) Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 56, pp. 1-10.  Ruff, K.M., Pappu, R.V., Holehouse, A.S. Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Biological […]

New concussion recommendations for kids

Light activity, electronics OK during recovery From the WashU Newsroom… The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its concussion recommendations to support children and teens engaging in light physical activity and returning to school as they recover. The report, revised for the first time in eight years, also advises against complete removal of electronic […]

Svrakic publishes book on personality disorders

From the WashU’s Campus Voices… In the new book “The Fragmented Personality,” Dragan Svrakic, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry at the School of Medicine, and Mirjana Divac-Jovanovic, of Sigidunum University in Serbia, introduce a new model for diagnosing and caring for patients with personality disorder. The approach yields a diagnosis sensitive to fluctuations in mental […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Pain And Opioid Systems, Implications In The Opioid Epidemic” (2019) Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences Pain And Opioid Systems, Implications In The Opioid Epidemic (2019) Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 26, pp. 69-74.  Massaly, N.a b c , Morón, J.A.a b c d a Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States b Washington University […]

Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s genetically linked

Managing cholesterol, triglycerides may reduce Alzheimer’s risk, study suggests From the WashU Newsroom… Studying DNA from more than 1.5 million people, an international team of researchers — led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco — has identified points of DNA that increase the risk of […]

Lee and Panagos awarded $1.2 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant

From the WashU Research Wire… Jin-Moo Lee, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, and Peter D. Panagos, MD, professor of emergency medicine, both at the School of Medicine, received a $1.2 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to establish the Mid-America Regional Coordinating Center as part of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s StrokeNet. StrokeNet is a […]

Inside the Psychologist’s Studio With Henry L. “Roddy” Roediger, III

From the Association for Psychological Science… APS Past President Henry L. “Roddy” Roediger, III has spent his illustrious career studying human learning and memory, particularly those processes involved in memory retrieval. His research has included examinations of memory illusions and false memories, people with exceptional memory abilities; and collective memory or how people remember events for […]

More pregnant women in U.S. smoking pot

From Reuters… Even as alcohol and tobacco use continue to decline among pregnant women in the U.S., a new study offers fresh evidence that more American mothers are using cannabis during pregnancy. Other recent studies have also documented a rise in cannabis use among pregnant women of all ages, with some evidence of particularly sharp […]

How Daylight Saving Time Changes More Than Clocks

From WBUR (Boston) & NPR… Most of the country switched their clocks back an hour over the weekend, ending daylight saving time. And even though one hour might not sound like a lot, it has a noticeable impact. “In the long term, this one hour cumulatively can really have effects on our health,” says Erik Herzog, […]

First-of-its-kind surgery allows child with polio-like illness AFM to walk again

From CBS News… Brian Noblitt says it only took one week for his son Brandon’s health to deteriorate in 2016. “One Saturday we played baseball, everything was normal,” he told correspondent Adriana Diaz. “Tuesday into Wednesday, cold-like symptoms. And then as the week progressed, had a headache and neck pain.” Days later, Brandon couldn’t use […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Pain And Opioid Systems, Implications In The Opioid Epidemic” (2019) Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences Pain And Opioid Systems, Implications In The Opioid Epidemic (2019) Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 26, pp. 69-74.  Massaly, N.a b c , Morón, J.A.a b c d a Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States b Washington University […]

Does a dysfunctional biological clock increase Alzheimer’s risk?

From The San Diego Union-Tribune… Disruption of the sleep-wake cycle is a well-recognized symptom of Alzheimer’s disease, but recent research suggests that a disorganized biological clock may also be a key driver of neurodegenerative disease. An exploration of the circadian rhythm’s role in development of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia is among a […]

St. Louis researchers study non-opioid painkiller

From KMOV 4… Families continue to be devastated by the opioid epidemic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 63,000 Americans died because of a drug overdose in 2016. Nearly two-thirds of those deaths (66 percent) involved a prescription opioid or illegal opioid. Now, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis […]

Michael Bruchas Receives the Jacob P. Waletzky Award

From the Society for Neuroscience… The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) will present the Jacob P. Waletzky Award to Michael Bruchas, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine, at Neuroscience 2018, SfN’s annual meeting and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. The award is given to a young scientist […]

$3 million to help expand Wolfram syndrome research

Grant to renew annual clinic, advance understanding of rare disorder From the WashU School of Medicine News… Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a five-year, $3 million grant to study Wolfram syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes neurologic problems, insulin-dependent diabetes and other serious conditions. The new grant, […]

Tien-Phat Huynh, 2018 Poletsky Award recipient

Tien-Phat Huynh, MSTP Neuroscience program student in the David Holtzman Lab, has been honored with the 2018 Poletsky Award. The Poletsky Award is presented annually by the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (KADRC) at Washington University, and is intended to enhance the career development of a promising student or fellow working towards a research, clinical […]

Grantham awarded $2.2 million training grant

From the WashU Research Wire… Heather Grantham, associate professor in the Program in Audiology and Communication Sciences (PACS) at the School of Medicine, will be the principal investigator on a $2.2 million training grant awarded to PACS from the U.S. Department of Education. The two five-year awards will provide scholarship support and expanded training opportunities […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Impact of fingolimod on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes in routine clinical practice: A retrospective analysis of the multiple sclerosis, clinical and MRI outcomes in the USA (MS-MRIUS) study” (2019) Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders Impact of fingolimod on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes in routine clinical practice: A retrospective analysis of the […]

Following tragedy, St. Louis hospitals renew commitment to postpartum mental health

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch… While pregnant with her fourth baby, Jerrika Massey felt depressed because her father died before he could meet his newest grandchild. He had always been there for her previous births. Massey didn’t tell anyone she was struggling because “I thought it was something I could handle by myself,” she said. […]

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

From NPR (heard on All Things Considered)… An ancient part of the brain long ignored by the scientific world appears to play a critical role in everything from language and emotions to daily planning. It’s the cerebellum, which is found in fish and lizards as well as people. But in the human brain, this structure […]

Mind’s quality control center found in long-ignored brain area

From the WashU Newsroom… The cerebellum can’t get no respect. Located inconveniently on the underside of the brain and initially thought to be limited to controlling movement, the cerebellum has long been treated like an afterthought by researchers studying higher brain functions. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis say overlooking […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Symptoms of social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder: A network perspective” (2019) Journal of Affective Disorders Symptoms of social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder: A network perspective (2019) Journal of Affective Disorders, 243, pp. 531-538.  Langer, J.K.a , Tonge, N.A.a c , Piccirillo, M.a c , Rodebaugh, T.L.a c , Thompson, R.J.a c , Gotlib, I.H.b d […]

Cox named Wise Endowed Chair in Pediatric Anesthesiology

Noted for his talents as educator, collaborator, clinician From the WashU School of Medicine News… Thomas E. Cox, MD, an innovative educator and noted mentor and anesthesiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been named the inaugural Rudolph L. and Mary Frances Wise Endowed Chair in Pediatric Anesthesiology. Cox, a professor […]

Grad students Hailun Li and Weikang Shi win 2018 Thach Awards

Many thanks to all who participated in this year’s Neuroscience Retreat.  Graduate student and post doc presenters at the Retreat were eligible for the Thach Award competition.  The 2018 winners: Short Talks: Hailun Li (Neuroscience Program; DiAntonio lab) “A neuromodulatory circuit regulating the glial capacity to buffer K+” Posters: Weikang Shi (Neuroscience program; Padoa-Schioppa lab) “Establishing […]

New child maltreatment research center launched with $6.5 million NIH grant

Multidisciplinary center includes Constantino’s research on newborns From the WashU Newsroom… Melissa Jonson-Reid, the Ralph and Muriel Pumphrey Professor of Social Work Research at the Brown School, and her team, including faculty from several disciplines across Washington University in St. Louis and Saint Louis University, have received a five-year, $6,496,050 grant from the National Institutes of Health […]

Bonni, Diamond elected to National Academy of Medicine

Membership is one of highest U.S. honors in health and medicine From the WashU School of Medicine News… Neuroscientist Azad Bonni, MD, PhD, and virologist and immunologist Michael S. Diamond, MD, PhD, both of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, a part of the National Academy […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Associations between depression, anxious arousal and manifestations of psychological inflexibility” (2019) Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry Associations between depression, anxious arousal and manifestations of psychological inflexibility (2019) Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 62, pp. 88-96.  Gilbert, K.E.a , Tonge, N.A.b , Thompson, R.J.b a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington University in St. […]

Implantable, biodegradable devices speed nerve regeneration in rats

Pulses of electrical stimulation help heal injured nerves From the WashU Newsroom… Car accidents, sports injuries, even too much typing and texting can injure the peripheral nerves, leaving people with numbness, tingling and weakness in their hands, arms or legs. Recovery can take months, and doctors have little to offer to speed it along. Now, […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Examining the Role of Cone-expressed RPE65 in Mouse Cone Function” (2018) Scientific Reports Examining the Role of Cone-expressed RPE65 in Mouse Cone Function (2018) Scientific Reports, 8 (1), art. no. 14201, .  Kolesnikov, A.V.a , Tang, P.H.b c , Kefalov, V.J.a a Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States b Department of Ophthalmology, […]

Both Sides of the Brain Are Active During One-Sided Arm Movement

From The Scientist… When you move only your right arm, there’s neural activity in both the left and right sides of the brain, researchers report today (October 8) in The Journal of Neuroscience. Recent animal and human studies have hinted that moving muscle on only one side of the body resulted in neural activity from the same side—or […]

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems

Mouse study provides clues to sudden onset of digestive woes From the WashU Newsroom… While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people possibly develop […]

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching” (2019) NeuroImage Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching (2019) NeuroImage, 184, pp. 335-348.  Demirtaş, M.a b , Ponce-Alvarez, A.b , Gilson, M.b , Hagmann, P.d , Mantini, D.e f , Betti, V.g h , Romani, G.L.i , Friston, K.j , Corbetta, M.k l , Deco, G.b c m n […]

Mysteries explored: Pioneering neurologist Marcus Raichle, MD, opened up the human brain to scientific investigation

From the WashU School of Medicine’s Outlook Magazine… In a 1987 expedition, neurologist Marcus Raichle, MD, climbed 18,000 feet above sea level, scaling the icy Karakoram Mountains of Pakistan. There, amidst heavy snow and high winds, Raichle and 18 researchers injected themselves with radioactive xenon. A crude scanner measured the gas as it diffused through […]