Arts & Sciences Brown School McKelvey School Medicine Weekly Publications

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Ambient PM2.5 and O3 and their combined effects on prevalence of presbyopia among the elderly: A cross-sectional study in six low- and middle-income countries” (2019) Science of the Total Environment

Ambient PM2.5 and O3 and their combined effects on prevalence of presbyopia among the elderly: A cross-sectional study in six low- and middle-income countries
(2019) Science of the Total Environment, 655, pp. 168-173. 

Lin, H.a , Guo, Y.b , Ruan, Z.a , Yang, Y.a , Chen, Y.c , Zheng, Y.b , Cummings-Vaughn, L.A.d , Rigdon, S.E.e , Vaughn, M.G.e , Sun, S.f , Zhang, L.a , Wang, X.a , Qian, Z.M.e , Wu, F.b g

a Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
b Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
c Medical Genetic Center Guangdong Women and Children Hospital, Xing Nan Street, Panyu, Guangzhou, Guangdong 511442, China
d Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, School of Medicine, Washington University-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States
e College for Public Health & Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63104, United States
f Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI 02912, United States
g Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control, Shanghai, 200336, China

Abstract
Background: Ambient air pollutant directly contacts with the eyes, however, the effect of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) on vision impairment, such as presbyopia, has been kept largely unknown. Methods: We surveyed a total of 36,620 participants aged 50 years and above in six low- and middle-income countries. Ambient annual concentrations of PM2.5 and O3 for the residential community were estimated using satellite data and chemical transport model. A mixed effects model was utilized to assess the effects of ambient PM2.5 and O3 on presbyopia, as well as their combined effects. Results: A total of 13,841 presbyopia cases were identified among the participants with a prevalence rate of 41.17%. For both PM2.5 and O3, we found a J-shaped exposure-response relationship with the threshold being identified at 15 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and 55 μg/m3 for O3. The odds ratio (OR) of presbyopia was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.21) for each 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 above 15 μg/m3 and 1.37 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.54) for O3 above 55 μg/m3 after adjusting for various potential confounding factors. There appeared to be a synergistic interaction between ambient PM2.5 and O3 on presbyopia in the additive model, the combined effect was significantly larger than the sum of their individual effects, with a synergistic index of 2.39. Conclusion: This study supports that exposures to ambient PM2.5 and O3 might be important risk factors of presbyopia among old adults, and simultaneously exposure to high level of the two pollutants could intensify their individual effects. © 2018

Author Keywords
Air pollution;  Low- and middle-income countries;  O3;  PM2.5;  Presbyopia

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Need for further analysis to explore the association between ADHD and asthma – Authors’ reply” (2018) The Lancet Psychiatry

Need for further analysis to explore the association between ADHD and asthma – Authors’ reply
(2018) The Lancet Psychiatry, 5 (12), pp. 963-964. 

Cortese, S.a b c d e , Sun, S.f , Zhang, J.g , Sharma, E.h , Chang, Z.f , Kuja-Halkola, R.f , Almqvist, C.f i , Larsson, H.f j , Faraone, S.V.k

a Centre for Innovation in Mental Health, Academic Unit of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom
b Clinical and Experimental Sciences (Central Nervous System and Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO171BJ, United Kingdom
c Solent NHS Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom
d New York University Child Study Center, New York, NY, United States
e Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom
f Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
g School of Education, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Big Data of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng, China
h Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Brown School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States
i Paediatric Allergy and Pulmonology Unit at Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
j School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden
k SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, United States

Document Type: Letter
Source: Scopus

“Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness-A Systematic Review of the Literature for the Balance Specialist” (2018) Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society (and) European Academy of Otology and Neurotology

Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness-A Systematic Review of the Literature for the Balance Specialist
(2018) Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 39 (10), pp. 1291-1303. 

Trinidade, A.a , Goebel, J.A.b

a Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff-on-Sea, United Kingdom
b Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To present a systematic review of the current data on persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD), a useful and relatively new diagnosis for a disorder that has previously been known by many different names. In addition, to discuss diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this condition with the otologist in mind. DATA SOURCES: CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, Google Scholar. REVIEW METHOD: The phrase “persistent postural-perceptual dizziness” and its acronym “PPPD” were used. RESULTS: From 318 articles, 15 were selected for full analysis with respect to PPPD. Most were case-control studies, with one consensus paper from the Bárány Society available. Overall, the pathophysiology of PPPD remains relatively poorly understood, but is likely to be a maladaptive state to a variety of insults, including vestibular dysfunction and not a structural or psychiatric one. Cognitive behavioral therapy, vestibular rehabilitation, selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) all seem to have a role in its management. CONCLUSIONS: PPPD is useful as a diagnosis for those treating dizziness as it helps to define a conglomeration of symptoms that can seem otherwise vague and allows for more structured management plans in those suffering from it.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Change in longitudinal trends in sleep quality and duration following breast cancer diagnosis: results from the Women’s Health Initiative” (2018) npj Breast Cancer

Change in longitudinal trends in sleep quality and duration following breast cancer diagnosis: results from the Women’s Health Initiative
(2018) npj Breast Cancer, 4 (1), art. no. 15, . 

Beverly, C.M.a , Naughton, M.J.b , Pennell, M.L.c , Foraker, R.E.d , Young, G.e , Hale, L.f , Feliciano, E.M.C.g , Pan, K.h , Crane, T.E.i , Danhauer, S.C.j , Paskett, E.D.k

a Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
b Division of Population Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
c Division of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
d Institute for Informatics, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108, United States
e Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
f Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, United States
g Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, Oakland, CA 94612, United States
h Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90509, United States
i College of Nursing, University of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, United States
j Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, United States
k Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States

Abstract
Breast cancer survivors frequently report sleep problems, but little research has studied sleep patterns longitudinally. We examined trends in sleep quality and duration up to 15 years before and 20 years after a diagnosis of breast cancer, over time among postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We included 12,098 participants who developed invasive breast cancer after study enrollment. A linear mixed-effects model was used to determine whether the time trend in sleep quality, as measured by the WHI Insomnia Rating Scale (WHIIRS), a measure of perceived insomnia symptoms from the past 4 weeks, changed following a cancer diagnosis. To examine sleep duration, we fit a logistic regression model with random effects for both short (<6 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep. In addition, we studied the association between depressive symptoms and changes in WHIIRS and sleep duration. There was a significantly slower increase in the trend of WHIIRS after diagnosis (β = 0.06; p = 0.03), but there were non-significant increases in the trend of the probability of short or long sleep after diagnosis. The probability of depressive symptoms significantly decreased, though the decrease was more pronounced after diagnosis (p < 0.01). Trends in WHIIRS worsened at a relatively slower rate following diagnosis and lower depression rates may explain the slower worsening in WHIIRS. Our findings suggest that over a long period of time, breast cancer diagnosis does not adversely affect sleep quality and duration in postmenopausal women compared to sleep pre-diagnosis, yet both sleep quality and duration continue to worsen over time. © 2018, The Author(s).

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Hydroxychloroquine-induced retinal toxicity in systemic lupus erythematosus” (2018) Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

Hydroxychloroquine-induced retinal toxicity in systemic lupus erythematosus
(2018) Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, 66 (12), pp. 1861-1862. 

Piggott, K.D., Apte, R.

Department of Ophthalmolgy and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, Louis, MO 63110, United States

Document Type: Short Survey
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Unilateral, 3D Arm Movement Kinematics Are Encoded in Ipsilateral Human Cortex” (2018) The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Unilateral, 3D Arm Movement Kinematics Are Encoded in Ipsilateral Human Cortex
(2018) The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 38 (47), pp. 10042-10056. 

Bundy, D.T.a , Szrama, N.a , Pahwa, M.a , Leuthardt, E.C.b c d e f

a Department of Biomedical Engineering, Japan
b Department of Biomedical Engineering, Japan
c Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, United States
d Department of Neurological Surgery, Australia
e Center for Innovation in Neuroscience and Technology
f Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States

Abstract
There is increasing evidence that the hemisphere ipsilateral to a moving limb plays a role in planning and executing movements. However, the exact relationship between cortical activity and ipsilateral limb movements is uncertain. We sought to determine whether 3D arm movement kinematics (speed, velocity, and position) could be decoded from cortical signals recorded from the hemisphere ipsilateral to the moving limb. By having invasively monitored patients perform unilateral reaches with each arm, we also compared the encoding of contralateral and ipsilateral limb kinematics from a single cortical hemisphere. In four motor-intact human patients (three male, one female) implanted with electrocorticography electrodes for localization of their epileptic foci, we decoded 3D movement kinematics of both arms with accuracies above chance. Surprisingly, the spatial and spectral encoding of contralateral and ipsilateral limb kinematics was similar, enabling cross-prediction of kinematics between arms. These results clarify our understanding that the ipsilateral hemisphere robustly contributes to motor execution and supports that the information of complex movements is more bihemispherically represented in humans than has been previously understood.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although limb movements are traditionally understood to be driven by the cortical hemisphere contralateral to a moving limb, movement-related neural activity has also been found in the ipsilateral hemisphere. This study provides the first demonstration that 3D arm movement kinematics can be decoded from human electrocorticographic signals ipsilateral to the moving limb. Surprisingly, the spatial and spectral encoding of contralateral and ipsilateral limb kinematics was similar. The finding that specific kinematics are encoded in the ipsilateral hemisphere demonstrates that the ipsilateral hemisphere contributes to the execution of unilateral limb movements, improving our understanding of motor control. Additionally, the bihemisheric representation of voluntary movements has implications for the development of neuroprosthetic systems for reaching and for neurorehabilitation strategies following cortical injuries. Copyright © 2018 Bundy et al.

Author Keywords
BCI;  ECoG;  electrocorticography;  ipsilateral;  reach

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Arousal-based scoring for obstructive sleep apnea” (2018) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Arousal-based scoring for obstructive sleep apnea
(2018) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 14 (11), pp. 1963-1964. 

Malhotra, R.K.a f , Kirsch, D.B.b , Carden, K.A.c , Rosen, I.M.d , Ramar, K.e

a Sleep Medicine Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Carolinas Healthcare Medical Group Sleep Services, Charlotte, NC, United States
c Saint Thomas Medical Partners – Sleep Specialists, Nashville, TN, United States
d Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
e Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
f American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2510 N. Frontage Road, Darien, IL 60561, United States

Document Type: Letter
Source: Scopus

“Response Changes During Insertion of a Cochlear Implant Using Extracochlear Electrocochleography” (2018) Ear and hearing

Response Changes During Insertion of a Cochlear Implant Using Extracochlear Electrocochleography
(2018) Ear and hearing, 39 (6), pp. 1146-1156. 

Giardina, C.K.a b , Khan, T.E.a , Pulver, S.H.a , Adunka, O.F.c , Buchman, C.A.d , Brown, K.D.a , Pillsbury, H.C.a , Fitzpatrick, D.C.a

a Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillNC, United States
b Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State UniversityNC, United States
c Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, United States
d Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. LouisMO, United States

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Electrocochleography is increasingly being utilized as an intraoperative monitor of cochlear function during cochlear implantation (CI). Intracochlear recordings from the advancing electrode can be obtained through the device by on-board capabilities. However, such recordings may not be ideal as a monitor because the recording electrode moves in relation to the neural and hair cell generators producing the responses. The purposes of this study were to compare two extracochlear recording locations in terms of signal strength and feasibility as intraoperative monitoring sites and to characterize changes in cochlear physiology during CI insertion. DESIGN: In 83 human subjects, responses to 90 dB nHL tone bursts were recorded both at the round window (RW) and then at an extracochlear position-either adjacent to the stapes or on the promontory just superior to the RW. Recording from the fixed, extracochlear position continued during insertion of the CI in 63 cases. RESULTS: Before CI insertion, responses to low-frequency tones at the RW were roughly 6 dB larger than when recording at either extracochlear site, but the two extracochlear sites did not differ from one another. During CI insertion, response losses from the promontory or adjacent to the stapes stayed within 5 dB in ≈61% (38/63) of cases, presumably indicating atraumatic insertions. Among responses which dropped more than 5 dB at any time during CI insertion, 12 subjects showed no response recovery, while in 13, the drop was followed by partial or complete response recovery by the end of CI insertion. In cases with recovery, the drop in response occurred relatively early (<15 mm insertion) compared to those where there was no recovery. Changes in response phase during the insertion occurred in some cases; these may indicate a change in the distributions of generators contributing to the response. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring the electrocochleography during CI insertion from an extracochlear site reveals insertions that are potentially atraumatic, show interaction with cochlear structures followed by response recovery, or show interactions such that response losses persist to the end of recording.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Assessing ventilatory instability using the response to spontaneous sighs during sleep in preterm infants” (2018) Sleep

Assessing ventilatory instability using the response to spontaneous sighs during sleep in preterm infants
(2018) Sleep, 41 (11), . 

Edwards, B.A.a b c , Nava-Guerra, L.d , Kemp, J.S.e , Carroll, J.L.f , Khoo, M.C.d , Sands, S.A.c , Terrill, P.I.g , Landry, S.A.a b , Amin, R.S.h

a Sleep and Circadian Medicine Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
b School of Psychological Sciences and Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
c Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
d Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
e Division of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
f Division of Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, United States
g School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
h Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States

Abstract
Study Objectives: Periodic breathing (PB) is common in newborns and is an obvious manifestation of ventilatory control instability. However, many infants without PB may still have important underlying ventilatory control instabilities that go unnoticed using standard clinical monitoring. Methods to detect infants with “subclinical” ventilatory control instability are therefore required. The current study aimed to assess the degree of ventilatory control instability using simple bedside recordings in preterm infants. Methods: Respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) recordings were analyzed from ~20 minutes of quiet sleep in 20 preterm infants at 36 weeks post-menstrual age (median [range]: 36 [34-40]). The percentage time spent in PB was also calculated for each infant (%PB). Spontaneous sighs were identified and breath-by-breath measurements of (uncalibrated) ventilation were derived from RIP traces. Loop gain (LG, a measure of ventilatory control instability) was calculated by fitting a simple ventilatory control model (gain, time-constant, delay) to the post-sigh ventilatory pattern. For comparison, periodic inter-breath variability was also quantified using power spectral analysis (ventilatory oscillation magnitude index [VOMI]). Results: %PB was strongly associated with LG (r2 = 0.77, p < 0.001) and moderately with the VOMI (r2 = 0.21, p = 0.047). LG (0.52 ± 0.05 vs. 0.30 ± 0.03; p = 0.0025) and the VOMI (-8.2 ± 1.1 dB vs. -11.8 ± 0.9 dB; p = 0.026) were both significantly higher in infants that displayed PB vs. those without. Conclusions: LG and VOMI determined from the ventilatory responses to spontaneous sighs can provide a practical approach to assessing ventilatory control instability in preterm infants. Such simple techniques may help identify infants at particular risk for ventilatory instabilities with concomitant hypoxemia and its associated consequences.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Signs and Artifacts in Amyloid PET” (2018) Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc

Signs and Artifacts in Amyloid PET
(2018) Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc, 38 (7), pp. 2123-2133. 

Lundeen, T.F., Seibyl, J.P., Covington, M.F., Eshghi, N., Kuo, P.H.

From the Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona/Banner University Medical Center, 1501 N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245067, Tucson, AZ 85724-5128 (T.F.L., N.E., P.H.K.); Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, Conn (J.P.S.); Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo (M.F.C.); and Departments of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz (P.H.K.)

Abstract
Establishing a diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia can be challenging, particularly early in the course of the disease. However, with disease-modifying therapies on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly important to achieve the correct diagnosis as soon as possible. In challenging presentations of dementia, such as patients with clinically atypical features or early-age onset of mild cognitive impairment, amyloid PET is a valuable tool in determining the diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia. Furthermore, preliminary data show that amyloid PET findings alter clinical management in patients who meet the appropriate use criteria. There are currently three U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved fluorine 18 (18F)-labeled radiopharmaceuticals that allow in vivo detection of cerebral amyloid deposition, which is a hallmark pathologic feature of Alzheimer dementia. Knowledge of the common imaging features among these three 18F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in the normal and abnormal brain will enable the radiologist to more accurately interpret amyloid PET studies. As in other subspecialties of radiology, imaging signs in amyloid PET are helpful to distinguish if a region is normal or abnormal. This article reviews appropriate use criteria for amyloid PET, introduces the properties of the radiopharmaceuticals, explains the algorithmic approach to interpretation with examples of normal and abnormal amyloid PET scans with MRI correlation, and provides an atlas of regional amyloid PET signs and common artifacts. ©RSNA, 2018.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Hemodynamic Impairment Measured by Positron-Emission Tomography Is Regionally Associated with Decreased Cortical Thickness in Moyamoya Phenomenon” (2018) AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology

Hemodynamic Impairment Measured by Positron-Emission Tomography Is Regionally Associated with Decreased Cortical Thickness in Moyamoya Phenomenon
(2018) AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology, 39 (11), pp. 2037-2044.

Lee, J.J.a , Shimony, J.S.a , Jafri, H.a , Zazulia, A.R.a b , Dacey, R.G., Jrc , Zipfel, G.R.b c , Derdeyn, C.P.d

a From the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (J.J.L., J.S.S.
b Departments of Neurology (A.R.Z.
c Neurosurgery (R.G.D., Washington University, St Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Radiology (C.P.D.), University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Impaired cerebrovascular reactivity has been associated with decreased cortical thickness in patients with arterial occlusive diseases. This study tests the hypothesis that severe hemodynamic impairment, indicated by increased oxygen extraction fraction ratios on positron-emission tomography with 15O tracers, is associated with decreased cortical thickness in patients with Moyamoya phenomenon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with unilateral or bilateral idiopathic Moyamoya phenomenon were recruited. Oxygen extraction fraction ratio maps were generated from cerebral images of O[15O] counts divided by H2[15O] counts with normalization by corresponding cerebellar counts. The normal range of the oxygen extraction fraction ratio was estimated from historically available healthy control subjects. Cortical thickness was estimated from T1-weighted MR imaging and FreeSurfer. Regional samples of oxygen extraction fraction ratios and cortical thicknesses were drawn using FreeSurfer parcellations, retaining only parcellations from the vascular territory of the middle cerebral artery. RESULTS: Complete MR imaging and PET datasets were available in 35 subjects, including 23 women; the mean age at scanning was 44 years. Patients with Moyamoya phenomenon had a significantly increased regional oxygen extraction fraction ratio compared with 15 healthy control subjects (P < .001). Regional oxygen extraction fraction ratio and age were significant predictors of cortical thickness (P < .001 for each) in a generalized linear mixed-effects model. Using hemisphere averages and patient averages, we found that only age was a significant predictor of cortical thickness (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Chronic hemodynamic impairment, as indicated by a higher regional oxygen extraction fraction ratio, was significantly predictive of reduced cortical thickness in mixed-effects analysis of FreeSurfer regions. This phenomenon may be related to reversible metabolic down-regulation. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Effect of perioperative gabapentin use on postsurgical pain in patients undergoing head and neck mucosal surgery a randomized clinical trial” (2018) JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Effect of perioperative gabapentin use on postsurgical pain in patients undergoing head and neck mucosal surgery a randomized clinical trial
(2018) JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 144 (11), pp. 959-966. 

Townsend, M., Liou, T., Kallogjeri, D., Schoer, M., Scott-Wittenborn, N., Lindburg, M., Bottros, M., Jackson, R.S., Nussenbaum, B., Piccirillo, J.F.

Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, McMillan Bldg, Campus Box 8115-06-805F, 660 S Euclid Ave, St Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
IMPORTANCE :Effective postoperative pain management increases patient satisfaction, reduces cost, reduces morbidity, and shortens hospitalizations. Previous studies investigating multimodal pain therapy in otolaryngology patients focused on homogenous patient groups with short postoperative follow-up times. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of perioperative gabapentin treatment on postsurgical pain in patients undergoing head and neck mucosal surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adults undergoing head and neck mucosal surgery from July 25, 2016, through June 19, 2017, were included in this double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial and randomized to receive gabapentin, 300 mg twice daily, or placebo before surgery and up to 72 hours after surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES :Primary outcome was hourly narcotic use calculated in morphine equivalents. Secondary outcomes included subjective visual analog scale pain scores captured for resting, coughing, and swallowing using a 0- to 100-mm scale (a 100-mm line anchored with no pain on the left end and worst possible pain on the right end). A change of 10 mm or more was deemed to be clinically meaningful. Additional secondary outcome measures included degree of pain control, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects. RESULTS: Of the 110 patients randomized to receive gabapentin or placebo, 11 and 10 withdrew from each group, respectively. Ninety patients were then analyzed: 44 in the gabapentin group (mean [SD] age, 61.1 [10.0] years; 33 [75%] male; 40 [91%] white) and 46 in the placebo group (mean [SD] age, 60.9 [11.3] years; 35 [78%] male; 43 [94%] white). Both groups had similar self-reported levels of preoperative pain and narcotic effectiveness. A median difference of 0.26 mg/h of morphine (95% CI, −0.27 to 0.94 mg/h) was found between groups. After controlling for comorbidity and self-reported baseline pain levels, mixed model analysis found the difference in marginal means of visual analog scale scores between groups to be lower in the gabapentin group compared with the placebo group for all categories (rest difference, 7.9 mm; 95% CI, −0.4 to 16.2 mm; cough difference, 8.9 mm; 95% CI, −0.5 to 18.3 mm; swallow difference, 9.4 mm; 95% CI, −1.2 to 20.0 mm). More patients in the gabapentin group reported that pain was always well controlled than in the placebo group (difference, 9.2%; 95% CI, −21% to 3%). Gabapentin and placebo groups reported similar levels of satisfaction with pain control (difference, 2%; 95% CI, −11% to 15%). There was no clinically meaningful difference in reported nausea between the 2 groups (difference, 6%; 95% CI, −14% to 26%). CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: Perioperative gabapentin given 300 mg twice daily did not result in reduced narcotic use, but results were compatible with clinically meaningful reductions in pain scores. Satisfaction with pain control and adverse effects were similar between groups. © 2018 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

Document Type: Conference Paper
Source: Scopus

“I Like Them…Will They Like Me? Evidence for the Role of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex During Mismatched Social Appraisals in Anxious Youth” (2018) Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology

I Like Them…Will They Like Me? Evidence for the Role of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex During Mismatched Social Appraisals in Anxious Youth
(2018) Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, 28 (9), pp. 646-654. 

Smith, A.R.a , Nelson, E.E.b , Rappaport, B.I.c , Pine, D.S.a , Leibenluft, E.a , Jarcho, J.M.d

a Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, United States
b Center for Biobehavioral Health, Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
c Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Socially anxious adolescents report distress during social decision-making, wherein their favorable view of peers directly conflicts with their expectation to be viewed negatively by peers; a phenomenon we refer to as “mismatch bias.” The present study utilizes a novel paradigm with dynamic social stimuli to explore the correlates of mismatch biases in anxious and healthy youth. METHOD: The behavioral and neural correlates of mismatch biases were assessed in healthy (N = 17) and anxious (N = 14) youth during functional MRI. Participants completed a novel task where they viewed silent videos of unknown peers. After viewing each video, participants appraised the social desirability of the peer (“How much do you think you would like them [if you met them]”) or predicted how socially desirable the peer would find them (“How much do you think they would like you [if you met them]”). Each participant’s mismatch bias was calculated as the difference between their appraisal of peers and their prediction of peers’ appraisal of them. RESULTS: We found that anxious youth exhibited mismatch bias: they rated unknown peers as more desirable than they predicted peers would rate them. This effect was not present in the healthy group. Mismatch biases were associated with increased engagement of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), a region broadly involved in flexible cognitions and behavioral selection. In addition, greater mismatch biases and vlPFC activation during mismatch biases were associated with more severe anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the importance of understanding mismatch biases to inform treatments that target distress elicited by discrepant social appraisals in anxious youth.

Author Keywords
adolescence;  fMRI;  social anxiety;  social cognition

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Polymodal TRPV1 and TRPV4 sensors colocalize but do not functionally interact in a subpopulation of mouse retinal ganglion cells” (2018) Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience

Polymodal TRPV1 and TRPV4 sensors colocalize but do not functionally interact in a subpopulation of mouse retinal ganglion cells
(2018) Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 12, art. no. 353, . 

Lakk, M.a , Young, D.a , Baumann, J.M.a b , Jo, A.O.a , Hu, H.c , Križaj, D.a b d

a Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
b Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
c Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Abstract
Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are projection neurons that transmit the visual signal from the retina to the brain. Their excitability and survival can be strongly influenced by mechanical stressors, temperature, lipid metabolites, and inflammatory mediators but the transduction mechanisms for these non-synaptic sensory inputs are not well characterized. Here, we investigate the distribution, functional expression, and localization of two polymodal transducers of mechanical, lipid, and inflammatory signals, TRPV1 and TRPV4 cation channels, in mouse RGCs. The most abundant vanilloid mRNA species was Trpv4, followed by Trpv2 and residual expression of Trpv3 and Trpv1. Immunohistochemical and functional analyses showed that TRPV1 and TRPV4 channels are expressed as separate molecular entities, with TRPV1-only (10%), TRPV4-only (40%), and TRPV1 + TRPV4 (10%) expressing RGC subpopulations. The TRPV1 + TRPV4 cohort included SMI-32-immunopositive alpha RGCs, suggesting potential roles for polymodal signal transduction in modulation of fast visual signaling. Arguing against obligatory heteromerization, optical imaging showed that activation and desensitization of TRPV1 and TRPV4 responses evoked by capsaicin and GSK1016790A are independent of each other. Overall, these data predict that RGC subpopulations will be differentially sensitive to mechanical and inflammatory stressors. © 2018 Lakk, Young, Baumann, Jo, Hu and Križaj.

Author Keywords
Calcium;  Endocannabinoids;  Glaucoma;  Retina;  RGC;  TRPV1;  TRPV4

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“A smartphone-based tool for rapid, portable, and automated wide-field retinal imaging” (2018) Translational Vision Science and Technology

A smartphone-based tool for rapid, portable, and automated wide-field retinal imaging
(2018) Translational Vision Science and Technology, 7 (5), art. no. 21, . 

Kim, T.N.a b c , Myers, F.b , Reber, C.b , Loury, P.J.b , Loumou, P.b , Webster, D.b , Echanique, C.b , Li, P.a , Davila, J.R.a , Maamari, R.N.b d , Switz, N.A.e , Keenan, J.c , Woodward, M.A.a , Paulus, Y.M.a , Margolis, T.d , Fletcher, D.A.b f

a Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
b Department of Bioengineering and Biophysics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States
c Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States
d Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA, United States
f Chan-Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, United States

Abstract
Purpose: High-quality, wide-field retinal imaging is a valuable method for screening preventable, vision-threatening diseases of the retina. Smartphone-based retinal cameras hold promise for increasing access to retinal imaging, but variable image quality and restricted field of view can limit their utility. We developed and clinically tested a smartphone-based system that addresses these challenges with automation-assisted imaging. Methods: The system was designed to improve smartphone retinal imaging by combining automated fixation guidance, photomontage, and multicolored illumination with optimized optics, user-tested ergonomics, and touch-screen interface. System performance was evaluated from images of ophthalmic patients taken by nonophthalmic personnel. Two masked ophthalmologists evaluated images for abnormalities and disease severity. Results: The system automatically generated 100° retinal photomontages from five overlapping images in under 1 minute at full resolution (52.3 pixels per retinal degree) fully on-phone, revealing numerous retinal abnormalities. Feasibility of the system for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening using the retinal photomontages was performed in 71 diabetics by masked graders. DR grade matched perfectly with dilated clinical examination in 55.1% of eyes and within 1 severity level for 85.2% of eyes. For referral-warranted DR, average sensitivity was 93.3% and specificity 56.8%. Conclusions: Automation-assisted imaging produced high-quality, wide-field retinal images that demonstrate the potential of smartphone-based retinal cameras to be used for retinal disease screening. Translational Relevance: Enhancement of smartphone-based retinal imaging through automation and software intelligence holds great promise for increasing the accessibility of retinal screening. © 2018 The Authors.

Author Keywords
Diabetic retinopathy;  Ophthalmoscopy;  Retinal imaging;  Smartphone

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Results in adult cochlear implant recipients with varied asymmetric hearing: A prospective longitudinal study of speech recognition, localization, and participant report” (2018) Ear and Hearing

Results in adult cochlear implant recipients with varied asymmetric hearing: A prospective longitudinal study of speech recognition, localization, and participant report
(2018) Ear and Hearing, 39 (5), pp. 845-862. 

Firszt, J.B.a , Reeder, R.M.a , Holden, L.K.a , Dwyer, N.Y.a , Asymmetric Hearing Study Teamd , Gotter, B.b , Mispagel, K.b , Potts, L.b , Vanderhoof, S.b , Holden, T.b , Brenner, C.b , Strube, M.b , Buchman, C.b , Chole, R.b , Drescher, A.b , Goebel, J.b , Hullar, T.b , McJunkin, J.b , Neely, G.b , Cowdrey, L.c , Lewis, K.c , Frazier, H.c , Zlomke, S.c , Cullen, R.c , Luetje, C.c

a Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States
b Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Saint Luke’s Hospital Midwest Ear Institute, Kansas City, MO, United States

Abstract
Objectives: Asymmetric hearing with severe to profound hearing loss (SPHL) in one ear and better hearing in the other requires increased listening effort and is detrimental for understanding speech in noise and sound localization. Although a cochlear implant (CI) is the only treatment that can restore hearing to an ear with SPHL, current candidacy criteria often disallows this option for patients with asymmetric hearing. The present study aimed to evaluate longitudinal performance outcomes in a relatively large group of adults with asymmetric hearing who received a CI in the poor ear. Design: Forty-seven adults with postlingual hearing loss participated. Test materials included objective and subjective measures meant to elucidate communication challenges encountered by those with asymmetric hearing. Test intervals included preimplant and 6 and 12 months postimplant. Preimplant testing was completed in participants’ everyday listening condition: bilateral hearing aids (HAs) n = 9, better ear HA n = 29, and no HA n = 9; postimplant, each ear was tested separately and in the bimodal condition. Results: Group mean longitudinal results in the bimodal condition postimplant compared with the preimplant everyday listening condition indicated significantly improved sentence scores at soft levels and in noise, improved localization, and higher ratings of communication function by 6 months postimplant. Group mean, 6-month postimplant results were significantly better in the bimodal condition compared with either ear alone. Audibility and speech recognition for the poor ear alone improved significantly with a CI compared with preimplant. Most participants had clinically meaningful benefit on most measures. Contributory factors reported for traditional CI candidates also impacted results for this population. In general, older participants had poorer bimodal speech recognition in noise and localization abilities than younger participants. Participants with early SPHL onset had better bimodal localization than those with later SPHL onset, and participants with longer SPHL duration had poorer CI alone speech understanding in noise but not in quiet. Better ear pure-tone average (PTA) correlated with all speech recognition measures in the bimodal condition. To understand the impact of better ear hearing on bimodal performance, participants were grouped by better ear PTA: group 1 PTA =40 dB HL (n = 19), group 2 PTA = 41 to 55 dB HL (n = 14), and group 3 PTA = 56 to 70 dB HL (n = 14). All groups showed bimodal benefit on speech recognition measures in quiet and in noise; however, only group 3 obtained benefit when noise was toward the CI ear. All groups showed improved localization and ratings of perceived communication. Conclusions: Receiving a CI for the poor ear was an effective treatment for this population. Improved audibility and speech recognition were evident by 6 months postimplant. Improvements in sound localization and self-reports of communication benefit were significant and not related to better ear hearing. Participants with more hearing in the better ear (group 1) showed less bimodal benefit but greater bimodal performance for speech recognition than groups 2 and 3. Test batteries for this population should include quality of life measures, sound localization, and adaptive speech recognition measures with spatially separated noise to capture the hearing loss deficits and treatment benefits reported by this patient population. Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved Printed in the U.S.A.

Author Keywords
Asymmetric hearing loss;  Cochlear implant;  Hearing aid;  Speech recognition.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Trait-level emotion regulation and emotional awareness predictors of empathic accuracy” (2018) Motivation and Emotion

Trait-level emotion regulation and emotional awareness predictors of empathic accuracy
(2018) Motivation and Emotion, . Article in Press. 

Eckland, N.S.a , English, T.b

a Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 603 E. Daniel St., Champaign, IL 61820, United States
b Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States

Abstract
Empathic accuracy (or how accurately a person perceives another’s emotions) has important implications for how individuals navigate their social world. We examined the role of two emotion-related traits (emotion regulation and emotional awareness) in predicting empathic accuracy and how these relationships may vary across racial groups. Undergraduate participants (N = 98) watched videos of European-American, Asian-American, and African-American targets playing a frustrating game and made continuous ratings of the target’s emotion. To assess empathic accuracy, these ratings were compared to targets’ self-reported emotion. We found mixed support for our initial hypotheses, such that individual differences in reappraisal and attention to emotions predicted accuracy under certain conditions. Exploratory analyses suggested suppression and emotional clarity have an interactive effect in predicting accuracy. This study provides evidence for the importance of individual differences in attention to and regulation of one’s own emotions for interpersonal sensitivity, as well as the importance of context for these emotion-related traits. © 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Author Keywords
Emotion regulation;  Emotional awareness;  Empathic accuracy

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Prenatal exposures and infant brain: Review of magnetic resonance imaging studies and a population description analysis” (2018) Human Brain Mapping

Prenatal exposures and infant brain: Review of magnetic resonance imaging studies and a population description analysis
(2018) Human Brain Mapping, . Article in Press. 

Pulli, E.P.a , Kumpulainen, V.a , Kasurinen, J.H.a , Korja, R.a b , Merisaari, H.a c d , Karlsson, L.a e , Parkkola, R.f , Saunavaara, J.g , Lähdesmäki, T.a h , Scheinin, N.M.a b , Karlsson, H.a i , Tuulari, J.J.a i j

a FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
b Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
c Department of Future Technologies, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
d Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
f Department of Radiology, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
g Department of Medical Physics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
h Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
i Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
j Turku Collegium for Science and Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland

Abstract
Brain development is most rapid during the fetal period and the first years of life. This process can be affected by many in utero factors, such as chemical exposures and maternal health characteristics. The goal of this review is twofold: to review the most recent findings on the effects of these prenatal factors on the developing brain and to qualitatively assess how those factors were generally reported in studies on infants up to 2 years of age. To capture the latest findings in the field, we searched articles from PubMed 2012 onward with search terms referring to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), brain development, and infancy. We identified 19 MRI studies focusing on the effects of prenatal environment and summarized them to highlight the recent advances in the field. We assessed population descriptions in a representative sample of 67 studies and conclude that prenatal factors that have been shown to affect brain metrics are not generally reported comprehensively. Based on our findings, we propose some improvements for population descriptions to account for plausible confounders and in time enable reliable meta-analyses to be performed. This could help the pediatric neuroimaging field move toward more reliable identification of biomarkers for developmental outcomes and to better decipher the nuances of normal and abnormal brain development. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Author Keywords
brain;  central nervous system;  growth and development;  infant;  magnetic resonance imaging;  maternal exposure;  neuroimaging

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Early red cell transfusion is associated with development of severe retinopathy of prematurity” (2018) Journal of Perinatology

Early red cell transfusion is associated with development of severe retinopathy of prematurity
(2018) Journal of Perinatology, . Article in Press. 

Lust, C.a , Vesoulis, Z.b , Jackups, R., Jr.c , Liao, S.b , Rao, R.b , Mathur, A.M.b

a Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the association between early (within 10 d) pRBC transfusion and the development of severe ROP. Study design and Methods: This was a single-center retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were preterm infants born ≤32 weeks gestation or weighing ≤1500 g. Severe ROP was defined as infants requiring retinal laser ablation or bevacizumab injection. Logistic regression was used to identify the association between transfusions and severe ROP. Results: A total of 1635 infants were included in the final analysis. The severe ROP incidence was 8% (126/1635). Ninety-one percent (115/126) of infants who developed severe ROP received a pRBC transfusion in the first 10 d. Early transfusion was associated with severe ROP; adjusted odds ratio of 3.8 (95% CI: 1.8−8.1). Conclusion: pRBC transfusions in the first 10 days of life are associated with an almost four-fold increased risk of severe ROP, independent of gestational age at birth or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) status. © 2018, Springer Nature America, Inc.

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Assessing cochlear implant performance in older adults using a single, universal outcome measure created with imputation in HERMES” (2018) Otology and Neurotology

Assessing cochlear implant performance in older adults using a single, universal outcome measure created with imputation in HERMES
(2018) Otology and Neurotology, 39 (8), pp. 987-994. 

Sharma, R.K.a , Chen, S.Y.a b , Grisel, J.c d , Golub, J.S.a

a Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surg., New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, 180 Fort Washington Ave., HP8-845, New York, NY 10032, United States
b Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
c Head and Neck Surgical Assoc., Wichita Falls, TX, United States
d Auditory Implant Initiative, Wichita Falls, TX, United States

Abstract
Objective: In the era of big data, it is critical to aggregate results across different institutions. This is a major challenge for cochlear implant (CI) research given multiple, incompatible outcome measures. We use a large, national CI database to develop a formula to convert between the two most common measures: Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant word (CNCw) and Arizona Biomedical (AzBio). We then use this tool to analyze hearing outcomes in older adults with a single, universal outcome measure. Study Design: Analysis of a prospective, national cochlear implant database (HERMES). Setting: Multicentered, 32 US private practice and academic medical centers. Patients: CI subjects (n=386, n=430 ears; 10-102 years old; mean: 65). Main Outcome Measure(s): CNCw, AzBio. Results: Univariable linear regression equations were generated relating CNCw and AzBio scores at each time-point. Correlation (R2) was 0.71 (3 mo), 0.69 (6 mo), 0.63 (12 mo), and 0.56 (24 mo) (all p &lt; 0.01). Using these equations, missing outcomes (CNCw, n =83 or AZBio, n=96) were imputed (calculated). The average absolute difference between observed and imputed CNCw (when both present) was 10.5% (95% CI=9.8-11.3). On multivariable regression, age was not a significant predictor of CNCw (p=0.38) after controlling for sex, hearing loss duration, use, and postoperative follow-up duration. Conclusions: We generated simple linear regression equations to calculate CNCw scores from AzBio, and vice versa, with good accuracy. This allowed one of the largest analyses of CI performance in older adults to date. We confirm that older age is not a significant predictor of performance when controlling for confounders. © 2018, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

Author Keywords
AzBio;  Big data;  CNCw;  Cochlear implants;  HERMES;  Outcome measures;  Performance measures;  Speech perception

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Erratum to: Neuroimmune disorders of the central nervous system in children in the molecular era (Nature Reviews Neurology, (2018), 14, 7, (433-445), 10.1038/s41582-018-0024-9)” (2018) Nature Reviews Neurology

Erratum to: Neuroimmune disorders of the central nervous system in children in the molecular era (Nature Reviews Neurology, (2018), 14, 7, (433-445), 10.1038/s41582-018-0024-9)
(2018) Nature Reviews Neurology, . Article in Press. 

Wells, E.a , Hacohen, Y.b c , Waldman, A.d , Tillema, J.M.e , Soldatos, A.f , Ances, B.g , Benseler, S.h , Bielekova, B.i , Dale, R.C.j , Dalmau, J.k l , Gaillard, W.a , Gorman, M.m , Greenberg, B.n , Hyslop, A.o , Pardo, C.A.p , Tasker, R.C.q , Yeh, E.A.r , Bar-Or, A.s , Pittock, S.e t , Vanderver, A.d , Banwell, B.d , Carpenter, J.u , Cortese, I.u , Dean, N.u , Farias-Moeller, R.u , Gallentine, W.u , Glaser, C.u , Goldbach-Mansky, R.u , Kahn, I.u , Lavenstein, B.u , McClintock, W.u , McDow, W.u , Murphy, J.u , Nath, A.u , Packer, R.u , Ronis, T.u , Schleyer, D.u , Schleyer, S.u , Shibuya, P.u , Utz, U.u , Vezina, G.u , Wessel, D.u , on behalf of the attendees of the International Neuroimmune Meetingu

a Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, United States
b Department of Neuroinflammation, Queen Square MS Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom
c Paediatric Neurology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom
d Department of Neurology and Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States
e Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
f National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States
g Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
h Section of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
i Neuroimmunological Diseases Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States
j Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, Kids Research Institute at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia
k ICREA- IDIBAPS, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
l Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
m Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States
n Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics and Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, United States
o Department of Pediatric Neurology and Epilepsy, Miami Children’s Hospital, Miami, FL, United States
p Johns Hopkins Transverse Myelitis Center, Baltimore, MD, United States
q Department of Neurocritical Care, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States
r Department of Paediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
s Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
t Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States

Abstract
In the original version of this Review published online and in print, the contribution of attendees of the International Neuroimmune Meeting to the content of the Review was not acknowledged. The author list has been corrected in the PDF and HTML versions of this article to acknowledge that the Review was written on behalf of attendees of the International Neuroimmune Meeting, and the names of the attendees have been added to the HTML version. © 2018, Springer Nature Limited.

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Acquired mania associated with a left temporal meningioma” (2018) Bipolar Disorders

Acquired mania associated with a left temporal meningioma
(2018) Bipolar Disorders, . Article in Press. 

Shen, S.Q.a e , Sinha, N.b , Perrin, R.J.b , Ghoshal, N.a c , Hawasli, A.H.d , Womer, F.Y.a

a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, United States

Author Keywords
acquired mania;  meningioma;  neurosurgery;  temporal lobe

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“A comprehensive screening of copy number variability in dementia with Lewy bodies” (2018) Neurobiology of Aging

A comprehensive screening of copy number variability in dementia with Lewy bodies
(2018) Neurobiology of Aging, . Article in Press. 

Kun-Rodrigues, C.a , Orme, T.a b , Carmona, S.a b , Hernandez, D.G.c d , Ross, O.A.e , Eicher, J.D.f , Shepherd, C.g , Parkkinen, L.h , Darwent, L.a b , Heckman, M.G.i , Scholz, S.W.j k , Troncoso, J.C.l , Pletnikova, O.l , Dawson, T.k , Rosenthal, L.k , Ansorge, O.h , Clarimon, J.m , Lleo, A.m , Morenas-Rodriguez, E.m , Clark, L.n , Honig, L.S.n , Marder, K.n , Lemstra, A.o , Rogaeva, E.p , St. George-Hyslop, P.p q , Londos, E.r , Zetterberg, H.s , Barber, I.t , Braae, A.t , Brown, K.t , Morgan, K.t , Troakes, C.u , Al-Sarraj, S.u , Lashley, T.v , Holton, J.v , Compta, Y.v w , Van Deerlin, V.x , Serrano, G.E.y , Beach, T.G.y , Lesage, S.z , Galasko, D.aa , Masliah, E.ab , Santana, I.ac , Pastor, P.ad , Diez-Fairen, M.ad , Aguilar, M.ad , Tienari, P.J.ae , Myllykangas, L.af , Oinas, M.ag , Revesz, T.v , Lees, A.v , Boeve, B.F.ah , Petersen, R.C.ah , Ferman, T.J.ai , Escott-Price, V.aj , Graff-Radford, N.ak , Cairns, N.J.al , Morris, J.C.al , Pickering-Brown, S.am , Mann, D.am , Halliday, G.M.g an , Hardy, J.a , Trojanowski, J.Q.x , Dickson, D.W.e , Singleton, A.c , Stone, D.J.ao , Guerreiro, R.a b ap , Bras, J.a b ap

a Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom
b UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI) at UCL, London, United Kingdom
c Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institutes on Aging, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States
d German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Tubingen, Germany
e Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, United States
f Genetics and Pharmacogenomics, Merck Research Laboratories, Boston, MA, United States
g Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia
h Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Oxford Parkinsons Disease Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
i Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, United States
j Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States
k Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States
l Department of Pathology (Neuropathology), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States
m Memory Unit, Department of Neurology, IIB Sant Pau, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid Sweden
n Taub Institute for Alzheimer Disease and the Aging Brain and Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States
o Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
p Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
q Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
r Clinical Memory Research Unit, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmo, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
s UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London UK; Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK and Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Molndal, Sweden
t Human Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom
u Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience and Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom
v Queen Square Brain Bank, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom
w Queen Square Brain Bank, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Clinical Neuroscience Institute (ICN), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Barcelona Spain
x Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States
y Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Sun City, AZ, United States
z Inserm U1127, CNRS UMR7225, Sorbonne Universites, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, Paris, France
aa Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, La Jolla, CA, USA
ab Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Department of Pathology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
ac Neurology Service, University of Coimbra Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal
ad Memory Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Mutua de Terrassa, University of Barcelona, and Fundacio de Docencia I Recerca Mutua de Terrassa, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain. Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Neurdegenerativas (CIBERNED) Madrid, Spain.
ae Molecular Neurology, Research Programs Unit, University of Helsinki, Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
af Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
ag Department of Neuropathology and Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
ah Neurology Department, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
ai Department of Psychiatry and Department of Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, United States
aj MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom
ak Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, United States
al Knight Alzheimers Disease Research Center, Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, United States
am Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
an Brain and Mind Centre, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
ao Genetics and Pharmacogenomics, Merck and Co, West Point, PA, United States
ap Department of Medical Sciences and Institute of Biomedicine, iBiMED, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal

Abstract
The role of genetic variability in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is now indisputable; however, data regarding copy number variation (CNV) in this disease has been lacking. Here, we used whole-genome genotyping of 1454 DLB cases and 1525 controls to assess copy number variability. We used 2 algorithms to confidently detect CNVs, performed a case-control association analysis, screened for candidate CNVs previously associated with DLB-related diseases, and performed a candidate gene approach to fully explore the data. We identified 5 CNV regions with a significant genome-wide association to DLB; 2 of these were only present in cases and absent from publicly available databases: one of the regions overlapped LAPTM4B, a known lysosomal protein, whereas the other overlapped the NME1 locus and SPAG9. We also identified DLB cases presenting rare CNVs in genes previously associated with DLB or related neurodegenerative diseases, such as SNCA, APP, and MAPT. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting genome-wide CNVs in a large DLB cohort. These results provide preliminary evidence for the contribution of CNVs in DLB risk. © 2018

Author Keywords
Copy number variants;  Dementia with Lewy bodies;  Genome-wide;  MAPT;  SNCA

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus