New strategy reduces brain damage in Alzheimer’s and related disorders, in mice

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common and best known of the tauopathies, a set of neurodegenerative brain diseases caused by toxic tangles of the protein tau. A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown that targeting astrocytes — an inflammatory cell in the brain — reduces tau-related brain […]

Holtzman, Karch honored for research into neurodegenerative diseases

Alzheimer’s researchers David M. Holtzman, MD, and Celeste Karch, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have been recognized by the Rainwater Charitable Foundation for scientific achievements that could lead to new, effective treatments for neurodegenerative diseases associated with the accumulation of tau protein in the brain. Alzheimer’s is the best known such disease. […]

Rainwater Charitable Foundation Announces Second-Annual Rainwater Prize Winners for Brain Research

The Rainwater Charitable Foundation, one of the largest independent funders of neurodegenerative disease research, today announced Dr. David M. Holtzman (the Andrew B. and Gretchen P. Jones Professor and Chair of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) and Dr. Celeste Karch (Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) as this year’s recipients of the Rainwater Annual Prize for […]

Board of Trustees grants faculty appointments, promotions

At the Washington University in St. Louis Board of Trustees meeting Oct. 2, several faculty members were appointed or promoted with tenure or granted tenure, effective that day unless otherwise indicated… …Promotion with tenure Luis F.Z. Batista to associate professor of medicine and of developmental biology at the School of Medicine (tenure effective Jan. 1); Nico […]

$29 million for new phase of international Alzheimer’s study

For more than a decade, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has led an international effort to better understand Alzheimer’s disease by studying people with rare genetic mutations that cause the disease to develop in their 50s, 40s or even 30s. The researchers have shown that the disease begins developing two decades or […]

Leading the way for personalized medicine

Washington University is working with unparalleled research capabilities to make personalized medicine a reality. The medical school is pioneering individualized treatment approaches in obesity, diabetes, breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Watch the video spotlight.

Genes linked to Alzheimer’s risk, resilience ID’d

An international team of researchers led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a pair of genes that influence risk for both late-onset and early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Most genes implicated thus far in Alzheimer’s affect neurons that transmit messages, allowing different regions of the brain to communicate with one […]

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia

Culprit is lone error in one gene, but researchers find many potential therapeutic targets From the School of Medicine News… Unlike the more common Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia tends to afflict young people. It accounts for an estimated 20 percent of all cases of early-onset dementia. Patients with the illness typically begin to suffer memory […]

Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s genetically linked

Managing cholesterol, triglycerides may reduce Alzheimer’s risk, study suggests From the WashU Newsroom… Studying DNA from more than 1.5 million people, an international team of researchers — led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco — has identified points of DNA that increase the risk of […]

ALS, rare dementia share genetic link

Findings point to potential treatment strategy for both disorders From the WashU Newsroom… Nearly half of all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neuromuscular disorder, develop cognitive problems that affect memory and thinking. Why a disease that primarily affects movement also disrupts thinking has been unclear. But now, an international team of researchers has […]

Link between 2 key Alzheimer’s proteins explained

Targeting tau production may lead to treatment From the WashU Newsroom… It’s a paradox of Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in their brains but do not have dementia. The memory loss […]