Seeing exponential growth for what it is

Understanding the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, requires understanding nonlinear growth, according to Jeffrey M. Zacks, PhD, associate chair and professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences, and of radiology at the School of Medicine, at Washington University in St. Louis. Whereas linear growth is intuitive, nonlinear growth is […]

Psychonomic Society recognizes Zacks with Mid-career Award

Jeffrey Zacks, PhD, associate chair and professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences, and of radiology at the School of Medicine, received the Mid-career Award from the Psychonomic Society. Zacks studies perception and cognition at Washington University in St. Louis using behavioral experiments, functional MRI, computational modeling and testing of neurological patients. The Psychonomic Society is […]

Stronger memories can help us make sense of future changes

Memory is as much about the future as it is the past. Whether experiencing something new, or something we’ve experienced a hundred times, people use memories of the past to navigate subsequent encounters. Traditionally, psychologists believed that the more ingrained a memory of something was, the more difficult it would be to update your understanding […]

Zacks receives $250K grant from James S. McDonnell Foundation

Jeffrey M. Zacks, associate chair and professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences and professor of radiology at the School of Medicine, received a four-year $250,000 grant from the James S. McDonnell Foundation to study event cognition “in the wild.” This project will take the research into the world, where people actually […]

Zacks awarded $2M grant from NIH

Jeffrey Zacks, professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences, received a nearly $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in support of a multiyear project titled “Improving Everyday Memory in Healthy Aging and Early Alzheimer’s Disease.” Read more.

Unless we spot changes, most life experiences are fabricated from memories

Change detection plays key role in how we construct reality, new model suggests From the WashU Newsroom… We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what’s happening in the present and predict what is likely to […]