Race of people given Alzheimer’s blood tests may affect interpretation of results

Three experimental blood tests used to identify people in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease perform differently in Black individuals compared to white individuals, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study showed that a fourth blood test — the PrecivityAD test, which is commercially available in the […]

Risky driving behaviors increase as common sleep disorder worsens

People with sleep apnea wake up tired in the morning, no matter how many hours they actually sleep. The condition causes them to briefly stop and restart breathing dozens or even hundreds of times a night. Even though such breathing interruptions often don’t awaken those with apnea, they prevent them from sinking into deep, refreshing […]

Damage early in Alzheimer’s disease ID’d via novel MRI approach

Alzheimer’s disease usually is diagnosed based on symptoms, such as when a person shows signs of memory loss and difficulty thinking. Up until now, MRI brain scans haven’t proven useful for early diagnosis in clinical practice. Such scans can reveal signs of brain shrinkage due to Alzheimer’s, but the signs only become unmistakable late in […]

Widening political rift in U.S. may threaten science, medicine

The lightning speed with which scientists developed and tested the COVID-19 vaccine is a true scientific triumph — one that would not have been possible without the more than 70,000 volunteers who participated in clinical trials of the vaccine. Public participation is critical to the success of any medical research. Yet recruiting volunteers for trials […]

Improving emergency care for people with dementia is focus of new grant

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of four institutions awarded a total of $7.5 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study and improve care in emergency departments for people with dementia. The school’s Division of Emergency Medicine, which will become the Department of Emergency Medicine in February, is one of […]

Racial differences in Alzheimer’s research focus of $15 million grant

In efforts to identify who is at risk of developing Alzheimer’s dementia, researchers over the years have zeroed in on several signs — or biological markers — that indicate early stages of the disease. If individuals could be identified long before symptoms of dementia begin to appear, doctors could target those patients with future preventive […]

Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer’s at risk of falls

Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries in older adults, causing more than 800,000 hospitalizations and about 30,000 deaths in the U.S. every year. Some risk factors are well-known — advanced age, problems with vision or balance, muscle weakness — but an under-recognized factor is early Alzheimer’s disease. Older people in the earliest stages […]

Dementia patients’ adult kids diagnosed earlier than their parents

A person’s chance of developing dementia is influenced by family history, variations in certain genes, and medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. But less is known about the factors that affect when the first symptoms of forgetfulness and confusion will arise. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis […]

New hope for old disease

Doctors may soon be able to predict, prevent Alzheimer’s disease From the WashU Outlook Magazine… Caring for an aging relative with Alzheimer’s disease, watching memories slowly slip away, is an exhausting and heartbreaking ordeal. For those with the condition, modern medicine can offer little in the way of treatment as the disease inexorably strips away […]

Alzheimer’s Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

From NPR’s All Things Considered… Scientists have found a biological clue that could help explain why African-Americans appear to be more vulnerable than white Americans to Alzheimer’s disease. A study of 1,255 people, both black and white, found that cerebrospinal fluid from African-Americans tended to contain lower levels of a substance associated with Alzheimer’s, researchers […]

Racial differences in Alzheimer’s disease unveiled

Findings suggest possible race-linked variations on how disease arises, develops From the WashU School of Medicine News… African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop Alzheimer’s disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white pool of research participants. Consequently, little […]

Before it begins: Family, researchers team up to cure — or even prevent — Alzheimer’s disease

From the WashU School of Medicine Outlook Magazine… A bequest by the late Daniel J. Brennan, MD, is supporting significant advancements in Alzheimer’s disease research at the School of Medicine. The disease affects 5.5 million Americans — a number expected to climb rapidly as people live longer. Following Brennan’s death in 2010, the estate gift created the […]

Major Alzheimer’s study aims to predict who will develop the disease

$10.3 million also funds efforts to establish disease timeline From the WashU Newsroom… Adults with an aging parent diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease are at elevated risk of developing the disease themselves. But doctors still don’t know enough yet to predict which of these adult children will go on to develop Alzheimer’s. Nor can they predict at […]

Pursuing a precision paradigm

Why move from current standards of patient care to a more personalized approach to treatment? Experts at the School of Medicine describe today’s medical landscape as they plan for the care — and cures — of the future. From the WashU Newsroom… Of the top-grossing domestic movies of 2017 to date, three of the Top 5 […]