Arts & Sciences Brown School Law McKelvey School Medicine Weekly Publications

WashU weekly Neuroscience publications

“Conformational preferences and phase behavior of intrinsically disordered low complexity sequences: insights from multiscale simulations” (2019) Current Opinion in Structural Biology

Conformational preferences and phase behavior of intrinsically disordered low complexity sequences: insights from multiscale simulations
(2019) Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 56, pp. 1-10. 

Ruff, K.M., Pappu, R.V., Holehouse, A.S.

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Biological Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States

Abstract
While many proteins and protein regions utilize a complex repertoire of amino acids to achieve their biological function, a subset of protein sequences are enriched in a reduced set of amino acids. These so-called low complexity (LC) sequences, specifically intrinsically disordered variants of LC sequences, have been the focus of recent investigations owing to their roles in a range of biological functions, specifically phase separation. Computational studies of LC sequences have provided rich insights into their behavior both as individual proteins in dilute solutions and as the drivers and modulators of higher-order assemblies. Here, we review how simulations performed across distinct resolutions have provided different types of insights into the biological role of LC sequences. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Document Type: Review
Source: Scopus

“Visualizing pregnenolone sulfate-like modulators of NMDA receptor function reveals intracellular and plasma-membrane localization” (2019) Neuropharmacology,

Visualizing pregnenolone sulfate-like modulators of NMDA receptor function reveals intracellular and plasma-membrane localization
(2019) Neuropharmacology, 144, pp. 91-103. 

Chisari, M.a , Wilding, T.J.b , Brunwasser, S.c , Krishnan, K.d , Qian, M.d , Benz, A.a , Huettner, J.E.b , Zorumski, C.F.a e , Covey, D.F.d e , Mennerick, S.a e f

a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States
f Department, of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Abstract
Positive modulators of NMDA receptors are important candidates for therapeutic development to treat psychiatric disorders including autism and schizophrenia. Sulfated neurosteroids have been studied as positive allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors for years, but we understand little about the cellular fate of these compounds, an important consideration for drug development. Here we focus on a visualizable sulfated neurosteroid analogue, KK-169. As expected of a pregnenolone sulfate analogue, the compound strongly potentiates NMDA receptor function, is an antagonist of GABAA receptors, exhibits occlusion with pregnenolone sulfate potentiation, and requires receptor domains important for pregnenolone sulfate potentiation. KK-169 exhibits somewhat higher potency than the natural parent, pregnenolone sulfate. The analogue contains a side-chain alkyne group, which we exploited for retrospective click labeling of neurons. Although the anionic sulfate group is expected to hinder cell entry, we detected significant accumulation of KK-169 in neurons with even brief incubations. Adding a photolabile diazirine group revealed that the expected plasma membrane localization of KK-169 is likely lost during fixation. Overall, our studies reveal new facets of the structure-activity relationship of neurosteroids at NMDA receptors, and their intracellular distribution suggests that sulfated neurosteroids could have unappreciated targets in addition to plasma membrane receptors. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Author Keywords
Click chemistry;  GABA;  Glutamate;  NMDA;  Photolabeling;  Pregnenolone sulfate

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“The reproducibility of urinary ions in manganese exposed workers” (2019) Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology

The reproducibility of urinary ions in manganese exposed workers
(2019) Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 51, pp. 204-211. 

Baker, M.G.a , Lin, Y.S.b , Simpson, C.D.a , Shireman, L.M.b , Searles Nielsen, S.c , Racette, B.A.c , Seixas, N.a

a Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way NE Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98105, United States
b Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St H-272, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
c Department of Neurology, Washington University, 660 S Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
Purpose: Manganese (Mn) is found in environmental and occupational settings, and can cause cognitive and motor impairment. Existing Mn exposure studies have not reached consensus on a valid and reproducible biomarker for Mn exposure. Methods: Previously, global metabolomics data was generated from urine collected in October 2014 using mass spectrometry (MS). Nine ions were found to be different between persons exposed and unexposed to Mn occupationally, though their identity was not able to be determined. Here, we investigated these nine ions in a follow-up set of urine samples taken from the same cohort in January 2015, and in urine samples from a separate Mn-exposed cohort from Wisconsin. We fit an elastic net model fit using the nine ions found in the October 2014 data. Results: The elastic net correctly predicted exposure status in 72% of the follow-up samples collected in January 2015, and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.8. In the Wisconsin samples, the elastic net performed no better than chance in predicting exposure, possibly due to differences in Mn exposure levels, or unmeasured occupational or environmental co-exposures. Conclusions: This work underscores the importance of taking repeat samples for replication studies when investigating the human urine metabolome, as both within- and between-person variances were observed. Validating and identifying promising results remains a challenge in harnessing global metabolomics for biomarker discovery in occupational cohorts. © 2018

Author Keywords
Biomarkers;  Exposure assessment;  Manganese;  Metabolomics

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Uncovering the association between fatigue and fatigability in multiple sclerosis using cognitive control” (2019) Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

Uncovering the association between fatigue and fatigability in multiple sclerosis using cognitive control
(2019) Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 27, pp. 269-275. 

Cehelyk, E.K.a , Harvey, D.Y.a b , Grubb, M.L.c , Jalel, R.a , El-Sibai, M.S.a , Markowitz, C.E.a , Berger, J.R.a , Hamilton, R.H.a , Chahin, S.d

a Neurology Department, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
b Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Elkins Park, PA, United States
c Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology, Widener University, Chester, PA, United States
d Neurology Department, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Ave Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
Background: Fatigue and cognitive dysfunction are two common symptoms experienced by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The relationship between subjective and objective fatigue (fatigability) in MS is poorly understood. Cognitive control tasks might be more conducive to fatigability and more likely to show associations between subjective and objective cognitive fatigue in MS. Objective: To study the association between objective fatigability, as induced by a cognitive control task called the Blocked Cyclic Naming Task (BCNT), subjective fatigue and baseline cognitive functioning in patients with MS. Methods: Twenty-one patients with MS completed baseline questions about their disease, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) battery and self-reported questionnaires on trait fatigue, sleep and depression. Disability was captured using the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Participants then performed the BCNT and were asked about their level of state momentary fatigue before and after the BCNT. The BCNT consists of several blocks of either related or unrelated pictures that participants name as quickly as possible. The pictures cycled 4 times in each block and the difference in the response times (RTs) between related and unrelated blocks was captured. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Pearson correlations. Results: MS participants’ performance declined for the related, but not unrelated blocks. The difference in RTs between related and unrelated conditions increased with repetition across cycles (p < 0.001). Participants also showed objective fatigability with less repetition priming (p = 0.02) in the 4th quarter and with greater differences between related and unrelated conditions in the later part of the task. Objective fatigability was strongly associated with participants’ assessment of their level of momentary state fatigue (r = 0.612, p = 0.007). Conclusion: Using the appropriate tools, this study showed an association between subjective and objective cognitive fatigue in people with MS. The BCNT and cognitive control are useful tools in assessing patients with MS and should be explored in future, larger studies in this population. © 2018

Author Keywords
analyses of variance (ANOVA);  blocked cyclic naming task (BCNT);  Cognitive dysfunction;  expanded disability status scale (EDSS);  Fatigue;  fatigue severity scale (FSS);  Mental fatigue;  modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS);  montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA);  Multiple sclerosis;  Multiple sclerosis relapsing remitting;  patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS);  Repetition priming;  response time (RT);  visual analog scale (VAS)

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Distinct cytokine profiles in human brains resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology” (2019) Neurobiology of Disease

Distinct cytokine profiles in human brains resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology
(2019) Neurobiology of Disease, 121, pp. 327-337. 

Barroeta-Espar, I.a , Weinstock, L.D.b c , Perez-Nievas, B.G.a , Meltzer, A.C.a , Siao Tick Chong, M.a , Amaral, A.C.a , Murray, M.E.e , Moulder, K.L.f , Morris, J.C.f , Cairns, N.J.f , Parisi, J.E.d , Lowe, V.J.g , Petersen, R.C.d , Kofler, J.h , Ikonomovic, M.D.i j , López, O.i , Klunk, W.E.j , Mayeux, R.P.k , Frosch, M.P.a , Wood, L.B.b c l m , Gomez-Isla, T.a

a Massachusetts General Hospital ADRC, Harvard University, 15 Parkman St #835, Boston, MA 02114, United States
b Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Dr, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
c Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, North Ave NW, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
d Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, United States
e Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Road South, Jacksonville, FL 32224, United States
f Department of Neurology, Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Washington University, 1 Brookings Dr, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States
g Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, United States
h Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 4200 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
i Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 4200 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
j Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 DeSoto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
k The Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain and The Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, 116th St & Broadway, New York, NY 10027, United States
l Georgia W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Dr, AtlantaGA 30332, United States
m Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, United States

Abstract
Our group has previously studied the brains of some unique individuals who are able to tolerate robust amounts of Alzheimer’s pathological lesions (amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) without experiencing dementia while alive. These rare resilient cases do not demonstrate the patterns of neuronal/synaptic loss that are normally found in the brains of typical demented Alzheimer’s patients. Moreover, they exhibit decreased astrocyte and microglial activation markers GFAP and CD68, suggesting that a suppressed neuroinflammatory response may be implicated in human brain resilience to Alzheimer’s pathology. In the present work, we used a multiplexed immunoassay to profile a panel of 27 cytokines in the brains of controls, typical demented Alzheimer’s cases, and two groups of resilient cases, which possessed pathology consistent with either high probability (HP, Braak stage V-VI and CERAD 2–3) or intermediate probability (IP, Braak state III-IV and CERAD 1–3) of Alzheimer’s disease in the absence of dementia. We used a multivariate partial least squares regression approach to study differences in cytokine expression between resilient cases and both Alzheimer’s and control cases. Our analysis identified distinct profiles of cytokines in the entorhinal cortex (one of the earliest and most severely affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease) that are up-regulated in both HP and IP resilient cases relative to Alzheimer’s and control cases. These cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-4 in HP resilient cases and IL-6, IL-10, and IP-10 in IP resilient cases, delineate differential inflammatory activity in brains resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology compared to Alzheimer’s cases. Of note, these cytokines all have been associated with pathogen clearance and/or the resolution of inflammation. Moreover, our analysis in the superior temporal sulcus (a multimodal association cortex that consistently accumulates Alzheimer’s pathology at later stages of the disease along with overt symptoms of dementia) revealed increased expression of neurotrophic factors, such as PDGF-bb and basic FGF in resilient compared to AD cases. The same region also had reduced expression of chemokines associated with microglial recruitment, including MCP-1 in HP resilient cases and MIP-1α in IP resilient cases compared to AD. Altogether, our data suggest that different patterns of cytokine expression exist in the brains of resilient and Alzheimer’s cases, link these differences to reduced glial activation, increased neuronal survival and preserved cognition in resilient cases, and reveal specific cytokine targets that may prove relevant to the identification of novel mechanisms of brain resiliency to Alzheimer’s pathology. © 2018 Elsevier Inc.

Author Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease;  Neuroinflammation;  Partial least squares regression;  Resilience

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“CA1 Nampt knockdown recapitulates hippocampal cognitive phenotypes in old mice which nicotinamide mononucleotide improves” (2018) npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease

CA1 Nampt knockdown recapitulates hippocampal cognitive phenotypes in old mice which nicotinamide mononucleotide improves
(2018) npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease, 4 (1), art. no. 10, . 

Johnson, S.a c , Wozniak, D.F.b , Imai, S.a

a Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States
b Department of Psychiatry, The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States
c Department of Gerontology, Laboratory of Molecular Life Science, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Japan

Abstract
Cognitive dysfunction is one of the most concerning outcomes in global population aging. However, the mechanisms by which cognitive functions are impaired during aging remain elusive. It has been established that NAD+ levels are reduced in multiple tissues and organs, including the brain. We found that NAD+ levels declined in the hippocampus of mice during the course of aging, and whereas we observed minimal age-related effects on spatial learning/memory capabilities in old mice, we discovered that they developed cognitive hypersensitivity in response to aversive stimulation during contextual fear conditioning tests. This cognitive hypersensitivity appears to be associated with alterations in emotionality (fear/anxiety) and sensory processing (shock sensitivity), rather than reflect genuine conditioning/retention effects, during aging. Supplementation of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) improved the sensory processing aspect of the hypersensitivity and possibly other related behaviors. Specific knockdown of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) in the CA1 region, but not in the dentate gyrus, recapitulates this cognitive hypersensitivity observed in old mice. We identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (Cask) as a potential downstream effector in response to age-associated NAD+ reduction in the hippocampus. Cask expression is responsive to NAD+ changes and also reduced in the hippocampus during aging. Short-term NMN supplementation can enhance Cask expression in the hippocampus of old mice. Its promoter activity is regulated in a Sirt1-dependent manner. Taken together, NAD+ reduction in the CA1 region contributes to development of age-associated cognitive dysfunction, aspects of which may be prevented or treated by enhancing NAD+ availability through supplementation of NAD+ intermediates, such as NMN. © 2018, The Author(s).

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Regional cortical thinning in young adults with schizophrenia but not psychotic or non-psychotic bipolar I disorder” (2018) International Journal of Bipolar Disorders

Regional cortical thinning in young adults with schizophrenia but not psychotic or non-psychotic bipolar I disorder
(2018) International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 6 (1), art. no. 16, . 

Godwin, D.a , Alpert, K.I.b , Wang, L.b , Mamah, D.a

a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, United States
b Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, United States

Abstract
Background: Schizophrenia shares some genetic risk and clinical symptoms with bipolar disorder. Clinical heterogeneity across subjects is thought to contribute to variable structural imaging findings across studies. The current study investigates cortical thickness in young adults diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder with a history of hyperthymic mania. We hypothesize that cortical thickness will be most similar between SCZ and the psychotic bipolar 1 disorder subtype. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (n = 52), psychotic bipolar I disorder (PBD; n = 49) and non-psychotic bipolar I disorder (NPBD; n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 40) were scanned in a 3T Trio MRI. The thickness of 34 cortical regions was estimated with FreeSurfer, and analyzed using univariate analyses of variance. Relationships to psychotic (SAPS) and negative (SANS) symptoms were investigated using linear regression. Results: Cortical thickness showed significant group effects, after covarying for sex, age, and intracranial volume (p = 0.001). SCZ subjects had thinner paracentral, inferior parietal, supramarginal and fusiform cortices compared to CON. Caudal anterior cingulate cortical thickness was increased in SCZ, PBD and NPBD. Cortical thickness in PBD and NPBD were not significantly different from controls. Significant partial correlations were observed for SAPS severity with middle temporal (r = − 0.26; p = 0.001) and fusiform (− 0.26; p = 0.001) cortical thickness. Conclusions: Individuals with SCZ displayed significantly reduced cortical thickness in several cortical regions compared to both CON and bipolar. We found that SCZ participants had significant cortical thinning relative to CON and bipolar disorder most significantly in the frontal (i.e. paracentral), parietal (i.e. inferior parietal, supramarginal), and temporal (i.e. middle temporal, fusiform) cortices. © 2018, The Author(s).

Author Keywords
Bipolar disorder;  Cortical thickness;  MRI;  Schizophrenia

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Obsessive, compulsive, and conscientious? The relationship between OCPD and personality traits” (2018) Journal of Personality

Obsessive, compulsive, and conscientious? The relationship between OCPD and personality traits
(2018) Journal of Personality, 86 (6), pp. 952-972. 

Mike, A., King, H., Oltmanns, T.F., Jackson, J.J.

Washington University in St. Louis, United States

Abstract
Objective: Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) is defined as being overly controlling, rigid, orderly, and perfectionistic. At a definitional level, OCPD would appear to be highly related to the trait of Conscientiousness. The current study attempts to disentangle this relationship by examining the relationship at a facet level using multiple forms of OCPD assessment and using multiple reports of OCPD and personality. In addition, the relationship between OCPD and each Big Five trait was examined. Method: The study relied on a sample of 1,630 adults who completed self-reports of personality and OCPD. Informants and interviewers also completed reports on the targets. Bifactor models were constructed in order to disentangle variance attributable to each facet and its general factors. Results: Across four sets of analyses, individuals who scored higher on OCPD tended to be more orderly and achievement striving, and more set in their ways, but less generally conscientious. OCPD was also related to select facets under each Big Five trait. Notably, findings indicated that OCPD has a strong interpersonal component and that OCPD tendencies may interfere with one’s relationships with others. Conclusions: Findings suggest that OCPD’s relationship with personality can be more precisely explained through its relationships with specific tendencies rather than general, higher-order traits. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Author Keywords
bifactor models;  Conscientiousness;  DSM-5;  facets;  OCPD

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Teaching and Learning Spelling” (2018) Child Development Perspectives

Teaching and Learning Spelling
(2018) Child Development Perspectives, 12 (4), pp. 235-239. 

Treiman, R.

Washington University in St. Louis, United States

Abstract
Learning to spell is important for writing and reading, but how spelling should be taught is a controversial topic. Although children learn about spelling to some extent as they encounter words while reading, this is not usually enough to make them good spellers. Children need systematic spelling instruction to learn how the writing system works and not just memorize how words are spelled. Phonics instruction is more effective than some other instructional approaches, but teaching phonics presents a simplified and in some ways inaccurate picture of English and some other writing systems. Studying words and the patterns they follow is more effective. To use such methods well, teachers need more opportunities to learn about writing systems and the development of spelling. © 2018 Society for Research in Child Development

Author Keywords
reading;  spelling;  writing

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Development of the CIDSS2 Score for Children with Mild Head Trauma without Intracranial Injury” (2018) Journal of Neurotrauma

Development of the CIDSS2 Score for Children with Mild Head Trauma without Intracranial Injury
(2018) Journal of Neurotrauma, 35 (22), pp. 2699-2707. 

Greenberg, J.K.a i , Yan, Y.b , Carpenter, C.R.e , Lumba-Brown, A.h , Keller, M.S.b , Pineda, J.A.c d , Brownson, R.C.b f g , Limbrick, D.D.a

a Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
c Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
e Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
f Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
g Prevention Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
h Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
i St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, One Children’s Place, St. Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
While most children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) without intracranial injury (ICI) can be safely discharged home from the emergency department, many are admitted to the hospital. To support evidence-based practice, we developed a decision tool to help guide hospital admission decisions. This study was a secondary analysis of a prospective study conducted in 25 emergency departments. We included children under 18 years who had Glasgow Coma Scale score 13-15 head injuries and normal computed tomography scans or skull fractures without significant depression. We developed a multi-variable model that identified risk factors for extended inpatient management (EIM; defined as hospitalization for 2 or more nights) for TBI, and used this model to create a clinical risk score. Among 14,323 children with mTBI without ICI, 20% were admitted to the hospital but only 0.76% required EIM for TBI. Key risk factors for EIM included Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 15 (odds ratio [OR] = 8.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.0-16.4 for 13 vs. 15), drug/alcohol Intoxication (OR = 5.1; 95% CI 2.4-10.7), neurological Deficit (OR = 3.1; 95% CI 1.4-6.9), Seizure (OR = 3.7; 95% CI 1.8-7.8), and Skull fracture (odds ratio [OR] 24.5; 95% CI 16.0-37.3). Based on these results, the CIDSS2 risk score was created. The model C-statistic was 0.86 and performed similarly in children less than (C = 0.86) and greater than or equal to 2 years (C = 0.86). The CIDSS2 score is a novel tool to help physicians identify the minority of children with mTBI without ICI at increased risk for EIM, thereby potentially aiding hospital admission decisions. Copyright © 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Author Keywords
clinical decision tool;  emergency medicine;  pediatric neurosurgery;  traumatic brain injury

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Shunt scissors: Technical note” (2018) Journal of Neurosurgery

Shunt scissors: Technical note
(2018) Journal of Neurosurgery, 129 (5), pp. 1200-1202. 

Dacey, R.G.a , Flouty, O.E.b , Grady, M.S.c , Howard, M.A., IIIb , Mayberg, M.R.d

a Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States
b Department of Neurosurgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Dr., Iowa City, IA 52242, United States
c Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
d Department of Neurosurgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

Abstract
Objective: When performing ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery it is necessary to create a subgaleal pocket that is of sufficient size to accommodate a shunt valve. In most cases the valve is placed over the posterior skull where the galea begins to transition to suboccipital neck fascia. Dense fibrous attachments in this region of the skull make it technically awkward to develop the subgaleal valve pocket using standard scissors and a blunt dissection technique. In this report the authors describe a new device that enables surgeons to create the shunt valve pocket by using a simple semi-sharp dissection technique. Methods: The authors analyzed the deficiencies of the standard valve pocket dissection technique and designed shunt scissors that address the identified shortcomings. These new scissors allow the surgeon to sharply dissect the subgaleal space by using an efficient hand-closing maneuver. Results: Standard surgical scissors were modified to create shunt scissors that were tested on the benchtop and used in the operating room. In all cases the shunt scissors proved easy to use and allowed the efficient and reliable creation of a subgaleal valve pocket in a technically pleasing manner. Conclusions: Shunt scissors represent an incremental technical advance in the field of neurosurgical shunt operations. © AANS 2018.

Author Keywords
Shunt scissors;  Surgical technique;  Valve;  Ventriculoperitoneal shunt

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Dynamic associations between borderline personality disorder and stressful life events over five years in older adults” (2018) Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment

Dynamic associations between borderline personality disorder and stressful life events over five years in older adults
(2018) Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 9 (6), pp. 521-529. 

Conway, C.C.a , Boudreaux, M.b , Oltmanns, T.F.b

a Department of Psychology, College of William and Mary, United States
b Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, United States

Abstract
The time course of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is far more variable than traditionally assumed. Shifting environmental conditions are theorized to account, at least in part, for fluctuations in symptom presentation over time. In the present study, we evaluated the reciprocal influences of stressful life events and borderline pathology in a representative community sample of 1,630 older adults assessed 3 times over 5 years. An autoregressive cross-lagged model revealed strong, but imperfect, stability in symptoms of BPD over the study time frame. After adjusting for this continuity in BPD, the prospective effect of life stress on borderline pathology was virtually nil, contrary to expectations. On the other hand, borderline pathology was prospectively related to subsequent dependent event (i.e., stressors to which individuals may have contributed), but not independent event (i.e., fateful stressors), exposure. This pattern of associations was consistent with a stress generation effect. We conclude that stressful life events do not substantially redirect the trajectory of BPD in older adults, possibly owing to inertia of borderline pathology at this developmental stage. Instead, symptoms of BPD seem to promote stress exposure, thereby setting the stage for continued social impairment and comorbid psychiatric problems. © 2018 American Psychological Association.

Author Keywords
Autoregressive cross-lagged;  Borderline personality disorder;  Life stress;  Longitudinal;  Stress generation

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Racial-ethnic disparities in first-episode psychosis treatment outcomes from the RAISE-ETP study” (2018) Psychiatric Services

Racial-ethnic disparities in first-episode psychosis treatment outcomes from the RAISE-ETP study
(2018) Psychiatric Services, 69 (11), pp. 1138-1145. 

Oluwoye, O.b , Stiles, B.d , Monroe-DeVita, M.d , Chwastiak, L.d , McClellan, J.M.d , Dyck, D.a c , Cabassa, L.J.e , McDonell, M.G.a b

a Washington State University, Spokane, United States
b Initiative for Research and Education, Advance Community Health, Department of Medical Education and Clinical Sciences, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, United States
c Department of Psychology, United States
d Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, School of Medicine, Seattle, United States
e George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, United States

Abstract
Objective: This study examined racial and ethnic differences in treatment outcomes among participants in a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for first-episode psychosis called NAVIGATE. Methods: Secondary data analyses were conducted for participants randomly assigned to usual community care (N=181) and NAVIGATE (N=223). Generalized estimating equations assessed whether race and ethnicity were associated with psychiatric symptoms and service use (medication management, family psychoeducation, and individual therapy) over a 24-month treatment period, accounting for baseline symptoms, duration of untreated psychosis, and insurance status. Results: Among persons in usual community care, non-Hispanic blacks scored significantly higher throughout treatment on measures of positive symptoms (b=2.15, p=.010), disorganized thoughts (b=1.15, p=.033), and uncontrolled hostility (b=.74, p=.027), compared with non-Hispanic whites, and non-Hispanic blacks were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to receive individual therapy (OR=.45, p=.001). Families of Hispanic participants in usual community care were less likely than non-Hispanic white families to receive family psychoeducation (OR=.20, p=.01). For NAVIGATE participants, race and ethnicity were not associated with differences in psychiatric symptoms over time; families of non-Hispanic black participants were less likely than those of non-Hispanic white participants to receive family psychoeducation (OR=.53, p=.009). Hispanic participants in NAVIGATE were more likely than non-Hispanic white participants to receive medication management (OR=2.93, p=.001). Conclusions: In usual community care, non-Hispanic blacks scored higher on measures of psychiatric symptoms and were less likely to receive important services, compared with non-Hispanic whites. In NAVIGATE, racial and ethnic differences in psychiatric symptoms were not evident, although non-Hispanic blacks were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to receive family psychoeducation. © 2018 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Behavioral interventions for obesity in children and adults: Evidence base, novel approaches, and translation into practice” (2018) American Psychologist

Behavioral interventions for obesity in children and adults: Evidence base, novel approaches, and translation into practice
(2018) American Psychologist, 73 (8), pp. 981-993. Cited 1 time.

Wilfley, D.E.a , Hayes, J.F.b , Balantekin, K.N.a c , Van Buren, D.J.d , Epstein, L.H.a

a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, United States
b Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, United States
c Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University at Buffalo, United States
d Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, United States

Abstract
Obesity in adults has nearly doubled in the past 30 years and has risen similarly in children and adolescents. Obesity affects all systems of the body, and the serious health consequences of obesity include an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, which are occurring at ever younger ages. The present article introduces traditional behavioral weight loss strategies designed to change energy-balance behaviors (i.e., dietary and physical activity behaviors) and the contexts within which these interventions have typically been delivered. The applicability of findings from behavioral economics, cognitive processing, and clinical research that may lead to more potent weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions are also considered. Given the pervasiveness of obesity, this article concludes with a discussion of efforts toward wider scale dissemination and implementation of behavioral treatments designed to address obesity and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2018 American Psychological Association.

Author Keywords
Behavioral health;  Behavioral treatment;  Cardiovascular disease risk;  Obesity

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Longitudinal analysis of developmental changes in electroencephalography patterns and sleep-wake states of the neonatal mouse” (2018) PLoS ONE

Longitudinal analysis of developmental changes in electroencephalography patterns and sleep-wake states of the neonatal mouse
(2018) PLoS ONE, 13 (11), art. no. e0207031, . 

Rensing, N., Moy, B., Friedman, J.L., Galindo, R., Wong, M.

Department of Neurology, Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Abstract
The neonatal brain undergoes rapid maturational changes that facilitate the normal development of the nervous system and also affect the pathological response to brain injury. Electroencephalography (EEG) and analysis of sleep-wake vigilance states provide important insights into the function of the normal and diseased immature brain. While developmental changes in EEG and vigilance states are well-described in people, less is known about the normal maturational properties of rodent EEG, including the emergence and evolution of sleep-awake vigilance states. In particular, a number of developmental EEG studies have been performed in rats, but there is limited comparable research in neonatal mice, especially as it pertains to longitudinal EEG studies performed within the same mouse. In this study, we have attempted to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of developmental changes in EEG background activity and vigilance states in wild-type mice from postnatal days 9-21. A novel EEG and EMG method allowed serial recording from the same mouse pups. EEG continuity and power and vigilance states were analyzed by quantitative assessment and fast Fourier transforms. During this developmental period, we demonstrate the timing of maturational changes in EEG background continuity, frequencies, and power and the emergence of identifiable wake, NREM, and REM sleep states. These results should serve as important control data for physiological studies of mouse models of normal brain development and neurological disease. Copyright: © 2018 Rensing et al.

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“Scaling out evidence-based interventions outside the U.S. Mainland: Social justice or Trojan horse?” (2018) Journal of Latina/o Psychology

Scaling out evidence-based interventions outside the U.S. Mainland: Social justice or Trojan horse?
(2018) Journal of Latina/o Psychology, 6 (4), pp. 329-344. Cited 1 time.

Rodríguez, M.M.D.a , Baumann, A.A.b , Vázquez, A.L.a , Amador-Buenabad, N.G.c , Rivera, N.F.d , Ortiz-Pons, N.e , Parra-Cardona, J.R.f

a Department of Psychology, Utah State University, United States
b Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, United States
c Investigaciones Sociales, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñíz, Mexico City, Mexico
d Independent Practice, Ponce, Puerto Rico
e School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Ponce Health Sciences University, Puerto Rico
f Steve Hicks School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin, United States

Abstract
Global health disparities continue to widen as professional standards for effectiveness of mental health services provision become more precise and difficult to achieve across varied economic and social contexts. Within the United States, health disparities are evident in Latinx populations. Globally, the health disparities are also evident in Latin America compared to the United States and other economically affluent nations. The diversification of psychology in content and persons has led to a unique opportunity to build bridges that can help reduce disparities in- and outside of the U.S. mainland. Collaborations can be of great use in addressing health disparities internationally and also are of critical importance in testing the ecological validity of existing interventions. It is imperative that researchers approach these exchanges as truly collaborative and power-even, because researchers in all locations stand to learn and grow from the partnership; otherwise U.S.-based researchers can unwittingly engage in intellectual colonization and advance cultural imperialism. U.S.-based researchers must be particularly thoughtful about disparities in both resources and consequences for success and failure in research contexts. We discuss specific failures, recoveries, and successes that may be useful to other researchers engaged in, or seeking to engage in, international collaborations. © 2018 American Psychological Association.

Las disparidades de salud globales continúan incrementado a medida que los estándares profesionales para determinar la efectivdads de los servicios de salud mental se tornan más precisos y difíciles de lograr en contextos económicos y sociales variados. Dentro de los Estados Unidos, las disparidades de salud son evidentes en las poblaciones Latinxs. A nivel mundial, las disparidades de salud también son evidentes en América Latina en comparación con los Estados Unidos y otras naciones económicamente ricas. La diversificación de la psicología en contenido y personas ha llevado a una oportunidad única para construir puentes que pueden ayudar a reducir las disparidades dentro y fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales. Las colaboraciones pueden ser de gran utilidad para abordar las disparidades de salud a nivel internacional, pero también son de importancia crítica para evaluar la validez ecológica de las intervenciones existentes. Es esencial que los investigadores aborden estos intercambios como verdaderamente colaborativos y con igualdad de poder, ya que los investigadores en todas las ubicaciones pueden aprender y crecer de la asociación, de lo contrario, los investigadores con sede en EE. UU. pueden involuntariamente caer en la colonización intelectual y avanzar en el imperialismo cultural. Los investigadores con base en los Estados Unidos deben ser particularmente cuidadosos con las disparidades en los recursos y las consecuencias para el éxito y los fracasos en los contextos de investigación. Discutimos fallas, recuperaciones y éxitos específicos que pueden ser útiles para otros investigadores comprometidos o que buscan participar en colaboraciones internacionales. © 2018 American Psychological Association.

Author Keywords
Health disparities;  Intervention research;  Research methods

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Developmental stages in the career of an academic neurosurgeon” (2018) Journal of Neurosurgery

Developmental stages in the career of an academic neurosurgeon
(2018) Journal of Neurosurgery, 129 (5), pp. 1364-1369. 

Dacey, R.G., Jr.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Psychiatry and developmental psychopathology: Unifying themes and future directions” (2018) Comprehensive Psychiatry

Psychiatry and developmental psychopathology: Unifying themes and future directions
(2018) Comprehensive Psychiatry, 87, pp. 143-152. 

Beauchaine, T.P.a , Constantino, J.N.b , Hayden, E.P.c

a Department of Psychology, Nisonger Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, The Ohio State University, United States
b Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, United States
c Department of Psychology, Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada

Abstract
In the past 35 years, developmental psychopathology has grown into a flourishing discipline that shares a scientific agenda with contemporary psychiatry. In this editorial, which introduces the special issue, we describe the history of developmental psychopathology, including core principles that bridge allied disciplines. These include (1) emphasis on interdisciplinary research, (2) elucidation of multicausal pathways to seemingly single disorders (phenocopies), (3) description of divergent multifinal outcomes from common etiological start points (pathoplasticity), and (4) research conducted across multiple levels of analysis spanning genes to environments. Next, we discuss neurodevelopmental models of psychopathology, and provide selected examples. We emphasize differential neuromaturation of subcortical and cortical neural networks and connectivity, and how both acute and protracted environmental insults can compromise neural structure and function. To date, developmental psychopathology has placed greater emphasis than psychiatry on neuromaturational models of mental illness. However, this gap is closing rapidly as advances in technology render etiopathophysiologies of psychopathology more interrogable. We end with suggestions for future interdisciplinary research, including the need to evaluate measurement invariance across development, and to construct more valid assessment methods where indicated. © 2018 Elsevier Inc.

Author Keywords
Developmental psychopathology;  Equifinality;  Interdisciplinary;  Multifinality;  Neurodevelopment;  Psychiatry

Document Type: Article
Source: Scopus

“Animal Models of Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy” (2018) Viruses

Animal Models of Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy
(2018) Viruses, 10 (11), . 

Caine, E.A.a , Jagger, B.W.a , Diamond, M.S.a b c d

a Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States
b Department of Pathology & Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States
c Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States
d Andrew M. and Jane M. Bursky Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged suddenly in the Americas in 2015 and was associated with a widespread outbreak of microcephaly and other severe congenital abnormalities in infants born to mothers infected during pregnancy. Vertical transmission of ZIKV in humans was confirmed when viral RNA was detected in fetal and placental tissues, and this outcome has been recapitulated experimentally in animals. Unlike other flaviviruses, ZIKV is both arthropod- and sexually-transmitted, and has a broad tissue tropism in humans, including multiple tissues of the reproductive tract. The threats posed by ZIKV have prompted the development of multiple in vivo models to better understand the pathogenesis of ZIKV, particularly during pregnancy. Here, we review the progress on animal models of ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These studies have generated a foundation of insights into the biology of ZIKV, and provide a means for evaluating vaccines and therapeutics.

Author Keywords
animal models;  congenital Zika syndrome;  mice;  non-human primates;  pathogenesis;  pregnancy;  vaccines;  Zika virus

Document Type: Review
Source: Scopus
Access Type: Open Access

“The synaptic action of degenerin/epithelial sodium channels” (2018) Channels

The synaptic action of degenerin/epithelial sodium channels
(2018) Channels, 12 (1), pp. 262-275. 

Hill, A.S., Ben-Shahar, Y.

Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, United States

Abstract
Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channels (DEG/ENaCs) are a large family of animal-specific nonvoltage gated ion channels, with enriched expression in neuronal and epithelial tissues. While neuronal DEG/ENaCs were originally characterized as sensory receptor channels, recent studies indicate that several DEG/ENaC family members are also expressed throughout the central nervous system. Human genome-wide association studies have linked DEG/ENaC-coding genes with several neurologic and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy and panic disorder. In addition, studies in rodent models further indicate that DEG/ENaC activity in the brain contributes to many behaviors, including those related to anxiety and long-term memory. Although the exact neurophysiological functions of DEG/ENaCs remain mostly unknown, several key studies now suggest that multiple family members might exert their neuronal function via the direct modulation of synaptic processes. Here, we review and discuss recent findings on the synaptic functions of DEG/ENaCs in both vertebrate and invertebrate species, and propose models for their possible roles in synaptic physiology. © 2018 The Author(s).

Author Keywords
ASIC;  DEG/ENaC;  Neuron;  Neuronal plasticity;  Synapse

Document Type: Review
Source: Scopus

“Alcohol, Cigarette, and Cannabis Use between 2002 and 2016 in Pregnant Women from a Nationally Representative Sample” (2018) JAMA Pediatrics

Alcohol, Cigarette, and Cannabis Use between 2002 and 2016 in Pregnant Women from a Nationally Representative Sample
(2018) JAMA Pediatrics, . Article in Press. 

Agrawal, A.a , Rogers, C.E.a , Lessov-Schlaggar, C.N.a , Carter, E.B.b , Lenze, S.N.a , Grucza, R.A.a

a Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States
b Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University, School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, United States

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Early behavioral indices of inherited liability to autism” (2018) Pediatric Research

Early behavioral indices of inherited liability to autism
(2018) Pediatric Research, . Article in Press. 

Constantino, J.N.

Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8504, St Louis, MO 63110, United States

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The observed heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—and the diversity of rare germline mutations with which it has been associated—has been difficult to reconcile with knowledge of its pronounced heritability in the population. Methods: This article reviews and synthesizes recent family and developmental studies incorporating behavioral indices of inherited risk for ASD. Results: Autism may arise from critical combinations of early inherited neurobehavioral susceptibilities—some specific to autism, some not—each of which may be traceable to partially-independent sets of genetic variation. These susceptibilities and their respective genetic origins may not relate to the characterizing symptoms of autism (after it develops) in a straightforward way, and may account for “missing heritability” in molecular genetic studies. Conclusions: Within-individual aggregations of a finite set of early inherited neurobehavioral susceptibilities—each individually common in the population—may account for a significant share of the heritability of ASD. Comprehensive identification of these underlying traits my help elucidate specific early intervention targets in individual patients, especially if autism represents a developmental consequence of earlier-interacting susceptibilities. Scientific understanding of the early ontogeny of autism will benefit from epidemiologically-rigorous, genetically-informative studies of robust endophenotypic candidates whose inter-relationships in infancy are mapped and normed. © 2018, International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc.

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Proactive and reactive cognitive control rely on flexible use of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex” (2018) Human Brain Mapping

Proactive and reactive cognitive control rely on flexible use of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex
(2018) Human Brain Mapping, . Article in Press. 

Ryman, S.G.a b , El Shaikh, A.A.b , Shaff, N.A.b , Hanlon, F.M.b , Dodd, A.B.b , Wertz, C.J.b , Ling, J.M.b , Barch, D.M.c , Stromberg, S.F.d , Lin, D.S.d , Abrams, S.d , Mayer, A.R.a b d e

a Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, United States
b The Mind Research Network/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM, United States
c Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
d Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, United States
e Department of Neurology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, United States

Abstract
The role of ventral versus dorsolateral prefrontal regions in instantiating proactive and reactive cognitive control remains actively debated, with few studies parsing cue versus probe-related activity. Rapid sampling (460 ms), long cue–probe delays, and advanced analytic techniques (deconvolution) were therefore used to quantify the magnitude and variability of neural responses during the AX Continuous Performance Test (AX-CPT; N = 46) in humans. Behavioral results indicated slower reaction times during reactive cognitive control (AY trials) in conjunction with decreased accuracy and increased variability for proactive cognitive control (BX trials). The anterior insula/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (aI/VLPFC) was commonly activated across comparisons of both proactive and reactive cognitive control. In contrast, activity within the dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was limited to reactive cognitive control. The instantiation of proactive cognitive control during the probe period was also associated with sparse neural activation relative to baseline, potentially as a result of the high degree of neural and behavioral variability observed across individuals. Specifically, the variability of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) within motor circuitry increased after the presentation of B relative to A cues (i.e., late in HRF) and persisted throughout the B probe period. Finally, increased activation of right aI/VLPFC during the cue period was associated with decreased motor circuit activity during BX probes, suggesting a possible role for the aI/VLPFC in proactive suppression of neural responses. Considered collectively, current results highlight the flexible role of the VLPFC in implementing cognitive control during the AX-CPT task but suggest large individual differences in proactive cognitive control strategies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Author Keywords
AX-CPT;  proactive cognitive control;  reactive cognitive control;  ventrolateral prefrontal cortex

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Adults’ sensitivity to graphotactic differences within the English vocabulary” (2018) Applied Psycholinguistics

Adults’ sensitivity to graphotactic differences within the English vocabulary
(2018) Applied Psycholinguistics, . Article in Press. 

Treiman, R.a , Decker, K.b , Kessler, B.R.E.T.T.c

a Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1125, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States
b University of Memphis, United States
c Washington University in St. Louis, United States

Abstract
Linguists have described the English vocabulary as including Latinate and basic subsystems. In three experiments with a total of 93 participants, we asked whether skilled readers are sensitive to graphotactic differences between these systems. Participants saw pairs of nonwords and were asked to choose the item in each pair that appeared more wordlike. Participants were more likely to select an item with an onset and an ending that suggested the same system than an item with a mismatch. Participants also used the presence of a single versus double medial consonant as a marker of the system to which an item belongs. The results suggest that skilled readers have learned about some of the graphotactic differences between Latinate and basic words and do not treat English as a monolithic system. © 2018 Cambridge University Press.

Author Keywords
graphotactics;  Latinate words;  reading;  vocabulary

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus

“Version 3 of the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set” (2018) Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders

Version 3 of the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set
(2018) Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, . Article in Press. 

Besser, L.a , Kukull, W.a b , Knopman, D.S.c , Chui, H.d , Galasko, D.e , Weintraub, S.f , Jicha, G.g , Carlsson, C.h , Burns, J.i , Quinn, J.j , Sweet, R.A.k , Rascovsky, K.l , Teylan, M.a m , Beekly, D.a m , Thomas, G.a m , Bollenbeck, M.a m , Monsell, S.o , Mock, C.a , Zhou, X.H.a , Thomas, N.a , Robichaud, E.a n , Dean, M.a n , Hubbard, J.a , Jacka, M.a n , Schwabe-Fry, K.a n , Wu, J.a n , Phelps, C.p , Morris, J.C.q , the Neuropsychology Work Group, Directors, and Clinical Core leaders of the National Institute on Aging-funded US Alzheimer’s Disease Centersr

a Department of Epidemiology, National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
b Institute for Healthy Aging and Lifespan Studies, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, United States
c Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
d Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, United States
e Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States
f Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Northwestern University Feinberg, School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States
g Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, United States
h Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Madison VA Hospital, Madison, WI, United States
i Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS, United States
j Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, United States
k Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States
l Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, United States
m Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, United States
n Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
o Center for Biomedical Statistics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
p National Institute on Aging (Retired), Bethesda, MD, United States
q Department of Neurology, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States

Author Keywords
Alzheimer disease;  Alzheimer disease center;  frontotemporal degeneration;  Key Words:;  Lewy body disease;  MCI;  National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center

Document Type: Article in Press
Source: Scopus